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To: Architects, Engineers, Designers, and Specifiers Re: LEED


Version 2.1 Recycled Content Value of Steel Building Products


TM


The U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED™) Green Building Rating System aims to improve occupant well-being, environ- mental performance and economic returns of buildings using established and innova- tive practices, standards and technologies.


Materials & Resources Credit 4: Recycled Content intends to increase demand for building products that incorporate recycled content materials, therefore reducing impacts resulting from extraction and pro- cessing of new virgin materials. As discussed and demonstrated below, steel building products con- tribute positively toward earning points under Credit 4.1 and Credit 4.2. The following is required by LEED Version 2.1:


Credit 4.1 (1 point) "Use materials with recycled content such that the sum of post-consumer recycled content plus one-half of the post-industrial content constitutes at least 5% of the total value of the materials in the project."


Credit 4.2 (1 point) "Use materials with recycled content such that the sum of post-consumer recycled content plus one-half of the post-industrial content constitutes at least 10% of the total value of the materials in the project."


"The value of the recycled content portion of a material or furnishing shall be determined by dividing the weight of recycled content in the item by the total weight of all material in the item, then multiplying the resulting percentage by the total value of the item." Since steel (the material) and steel (the building product) are the same, the value of the steel building product is directly multiplied by steel's recycled con- tent, or:


Steel Recycled Content Value = (Value of Steel Product) (Post-Consumer % + ½ Post-Industrial %)


The information contained within this brochure provides post-consumer and post-industrial recycled con- tent percentages for North American steel building products. These percentages and values of steel building products are easily entered into LEED Letter Template spreadsheet for calculation. To illustrate the application of these steel recycled content values to LEED, manual calculations are shown below for typical Basic Oxygen Furnace (BOF) and Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) steel building products with nomi- nal $10,000 purchases, using 2003 data. Steel building products include steel stud framing, structural steel framing (wide flange beams, channels, angles, etc.), rebar, roofing, siding, decking, doors and sash- es, windows, ductwork, pipe, fixtures, hardware (hinges, handles, braces, screws, nails), culverts, storm drains, and manhole covers.


BOF Steel Recycled Content Value for Typical Product: Steel Stud Framing


Value = ($10,000) (23.0 % + ½ 7.3 %) = ($10,000) (26.65 %) = $2,665 (Exceeds 5% and 10% goals)


EAF Steel Recycled Content Value for Typical Product: Wide Flange Structural Steel Framing


Value = ($10,000) (58.6 % + ½ 32.6 %) = ($10,000) (74.90 %) = $7,490 (Exceeds 5% and 10% goals)


American


Institute of Steel Construction, Inc. 1 East Wacker Dr., Suite 3100 Chicago, IL 60601-2000 866.ASK.AISC solutions@aisc.org


Steel Recycling Institute


680 Andersen Dr. Pittsburgh, PA 15220-2700 412.922.2772 sri@recycle- steel.org


American


Iron and Steel Institute


1140 Connecticut Ave., Suite 705 Washington, DC 20036


202.452.7100


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