This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
In the midst of a seemingly perfect storm (or swarm, if you like) of biting blood bandits stands Dave Chadee, whose research subjects are real havok- wreakers


Trials of the device began in Trinidad and also Down Under in January. Should the testing yield the expected results — a massive reduction in the


number of breeding mosquitoes and their eggs — the trap will be marketed by a German company. This crucial link, which will transform his idea and data into a commercially viable product that can be marketed and sold across the mosquito-ridden world, was procured by the Australian university. “That’s the reason you need to develop good collaborations,” Chadee points out.


C


hadee’s expertise is, understandably, in great demand — by the World Health Organisation, the Pan American Health Organisation, CARICOM, and various governments (for example, Burkina Faso asked him for help in dealing with dengue). Chadee was also appointed a member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in 2010, and since 2004 he’s been an adjunct professor in the Department of Epidemiology and the Global Public Health Programme at the University of Miami. His current list of research projects includes the impact of cell tower radiation on the health and well-being of three study populations in Trinidad,


and the rearing of Philornis downsi, a parasite that affects Darwin f inches, which are now endangered. The International Atomic Energy Agency awarded Chadee and his compatriot John Agard — a fellow UWI professor and member of the IPCC — a research grant to help colonise the flies so biological controls could be developed. And in 2013 Chadee was awarded an Anthony N. Sabga Caribbean Award for Excellence, which came with a US$80,000 prize. The idea of, say, taking a cruise with some that award money makes Chadee burst


of into


laughter. “I don’t go on vacation,” he explains. “Work is pleasure for me. I am absolutely delighted that people pay me to do this job and reward me for it.” And there are many productive ways to use the award, he says. At the top of the list: completing a book on


flooding and climate change, with a special focus on the Caribbean. Although the region suffers annually from hurricanes and storms, and the urbanisation of our islands is multiplying the effects of torrential rains and flash floods, very little data has been collected, and there is no literature to draw on. “We are hoping to change that with this book,” Chadee says, and given his track-record for groundbreaking science with big real-life impact, there’s no reason to doubt him. n


WWW.CARIBBEAN-AIRLINES.COM 85


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100