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Chin’s mother and husband join her on The Voice stage, after she was named winner of the contest


hundred and fifty of us [contestants] and they say, ‘The winner of The Voice is in this room,’ nobody thinks ‘It’s going to be me.’” But with support from Jamaica growing, the urge to win took


hold. The Jamaican fan base mobilised into action, unleashing an unprecedented social media campaign to drive votes from Jamaicans in the United States — the show’s viewers can participate in the judging process by voting online and by phone, and purchasing recordings of


the contestants’ performances


from Apple’s iTunes music store. Chin was “completely blindsided” by that support, she says.


“Shaggy had told me it would be big, but I had no idea. When TVJ [Television Jamaica] bought the rights [to broadcast the show], I started to think, This is definitely bigger than I had anticipated. “I keep saying that I started this because I wanted to move


forward. It quickly became about a lot more than me. Omigosh, I have a little nation with me. Very moving and empowering. I have the backative of my people.” By the time her version of “Bridge Over Troubled Water”


hit number one on the iTunes charts, Chin had realised the magnitude of the momentum behind her. Pundits disagree on the degree to which Jamaican support had an impact. The numbers speak for themselves. The first contestant to earn a number one slot on the iTunes chart, Chin made Voice history. By the close of the competition, she had six songs on the iTunes top 100 chart, surpassing all other artistes in iTunes charts history. And as of the first week of January 2014, two of her Voice performances — her covers of “I Have Nothing” and the Beatles’


46 WWW.CARIBBEAN-BEAT.COM


“Let It Be”, which she performed with Adam Levine — had made the Billboard Hot 100 chart.


C


hin’s first two public appearances after winning The Voice befitted her status as a new star: on 1 January she performed at the annual Rose Bowl Parade in California,


atop the first ever The Voice float, and three days later she headlined the Shaggy and Friends benefit concert, joining Ne- yo, fellow Voice contestant Matthew Schuler, Sean Paul, Damian “Junior Gong” Marley, and a host of local artists in raising funds for the Bustamante Children’s Hospital “It felt right to have Shaggy be my first show back [in


Jamaica],” she says. “I’ve been a part of it since the beginning. And I love the cause. I was happy and proud to be back. The Jamaican crowd can be very iffy, but they showed me so much warmth.” And with her homecoming celebrations now behind her,


Chin’s focus is on her debut album with Universal Music Group, scheduled for release in late March. She promises a generous helping of what she describes as “island swag,” and collaborations with artistes including Jamaican superstar Junior Gong. It’s rumoured that the album will be recorded at GeeJam Studios, in east Jamaica’s Portland, where stars like Drake, Diplo, and Snoop Lion have also worked. It’s all in keeping with Chin’s dream of creating world-class music based at home. Above all, her goal is to make music that’s true to her. “It’s not about trends, or anything but you,” she says. “Lyrical content


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