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eat smart | GLUTEN Foods allowed in a gluten-free diet


There are still many basic foods allowed in a gluten-free diet. Products labeled gluten-free are also safe. These include:


(www.mayoclinic.com)


Potatoes


Most dairy products


Rice


Fruits


Gluten-free flours (rice, soy, corn, potato)


Vegetables


Wine and distilled liquors, ciders and spirits


Fresh meats, fish and poultry (not breaded, batter-


coated or marinated)


The gluten-free diet


There is no cure for celiac disease. The treatment is a gluten-free diet for life. This means not eating foods that contain wheat, rye and barley. The foods and products made from those grains should also be avoided. Fortunately, there are lots of gluten- free and wheat-free products on the market today.


What else can you eat you ask? Plenty. Potato, rice, soy, amaranth, quinoa, buckwheat or bean fl our instead of wheat fl our. Eat all the fruits and veggies you want. And of course, there’s no gluten in meats or fi sh, so enjoy as you wish. There are also many restaurants that cater to those with gluten-intolerance. Below are two of Jafferali’s favorites:


• Adobo Grill with several Midwest locations features delicious Mexican fare with ample choices for the wheat-


challenged. There’s guacamole with jicama chips; Barbacoa-style chicken tamales steamed in a corn husk; and shrimp ceviche with classic Mexican cocktail sauce and pico de gallo.


• Chinese restaurants with veggie and rice dishes offer plenty of options. PF Chang’s has a special gluten-free menu that will take you from starters through desserts.


As you can see, you don’t have to give up pizza or your favorite ethnic foods. There


are


many websites that will help you fi nd the best places to dine wheat-free in your area.


18 issue 1, 2014 midwest health+wellness


For more information on managing celiac disease, visit the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness at www.celiaccentral.org.


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