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COMPANY SPOTLIGHT – WEDGE GROUP GALVANISING


GALVACOAT – BRUSHED WITH SUCCESS


Galvanizing has


long been recognised as one of the most


durable, long-lasting, protective finishes


available on the market, but it is a process that has previously


thrown up a number of practical issues when


the end product requires painting to provide an aesthetically- pleasing look.


Trevor Beech of Wedge Group Galvanizing,


one of the UK’s largest hot-dip galvanizing


organisation’s, outlines how a new specially developed one-coat paint system can


make these problems a thing of the past.


“For the vast majority of steel-related construction projects, hot dip galvanizing is the most effective process to provide a long-lasting protective coating against rust and corrosion, and has consistently been regarded as one of the most robust and durable finishes available. However, there are certain situations whereby once steelwork – both structural and decorative – has been galvanized, colour needs to be added to either complement a company’s existing branding, or perhaps heighten its visual impact.


The test involves a painted steel surface being cross-cut to leave small squares, which when sticky tape is applied over, will rip the paint from the steel if the bond isn’t strong enough – GT0 classification is only achieved in instances where the tape cannot remove any paint from the steel.


The paint is available in all RAL and BS colours at different levels of gloss, allowing the end contractor a huge degree of design freedom. Galvanizing provides an ideal primer for Galvacoat®


, which


can be painted directly onto freshly galvanized steel via a single coat, either on-site or in- house. Once applied, the paint can last for a minimum of 8-10 years, which eliminates the need for repeated on-site maintenance or replacement costs, making it a long-term and cost effective solution.


Galvacoat® is already becoming


With traditional paints, there can be a problem with adhesion, and if it doesn’t bond adequately to a galvanized surface it can consequently peel, or flake prematurely – which essentially leaves an aesthetically poor finish, not to mention the additional time and resources required to resolve the issue. To ensure that the paint remains on the surface of the steel, it must be compatible with the galvanized coating, a winning combination that will provide unparalleled corrosion protection.


Wedge Group Galvanizing is the sole UK distributor of Galvacoat®


,


a one-coat, two component polyurethane-based paint which has been specifically designed for use on galvanized steel. What’s more, it has been developed to give GT0 adhesion, the British Standards test method for adhesion classified as GT0 (BS 3900 Part 6 on Galvanized Steel).


4 SURFACE WORLD February 2014


hugely popular with a variety of contractors, despite only having been available in the UK for a relatively short period of time.


We have supplied a significant order to leading retailer Tesco, who has used it to protect steel gantries installed on the forecourts at all of its petrol stations across the UK. It has also received significant interest from a diverse range of industries and projects, from being applied to steel staircases and external railings, to adding a touch of colour to signage and structural steel columns.”


Wedge Group Galvanizing is one of the largest hot dip galvanizing organisation’s in the UK with a history dating back over 150 years. With 14 plants strategically placed across the country, they offer a truly national galvanizing service.


For further information please contact Wedge Group Galvanizing Telephone: 01902 630311 www.wedge-galv.co.uk


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