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PAINT & POWDER COATING PRODUCTS & PROCESSES The process explained:


The system is designed to automatically apply powder to the required areas to the internal and external surfaces of the fabricated JCB cab. The conveyor system transports the cab assembly to the first stop station, at which point the camera system captures a 3D geometry image of the product. The specialist recognition software identifies the product from 50 variants and automatically selects the program, downloading the data to the two robots. The booth ready signal notifies booth doors open and the component traverses into its first coating station position.


The system utilises offline 3D simulation software programming, Chris Phillips, Manufacturing engineer and robot programmer at JCB Cab Systems explained “The 3D simulation is a simple point and click software that allows me to accurately program the spray pattern offline, this minimizes the levels of disruption to production, something which is key to our process. Programs can be quickly amended off-line, this also allows me to assess for paint coverage prior to production.”


David Carver, Head of Operations at JCB Cab Systems explained “The new production line has increased throughput


levels, this has resulted in noticeable improvements in aesthetic finish, repeatability and powder savings.”


Leon Hogg, Head of Sales at Gema UK explained “During the coating process the booth purges the system through a series of pulse cleaning systems which are integrated within the booth floor structure. Any over sprayed powder is recovered through the 32,000m³/hr mono cyclone system and recycled ensuring maximum yield of the powder.


Powder is fed to the system via the 500kg bulk bag virgin feed system which automatically re-charges the fluidizing system when powder levels run low. From plant inception to installation, commissioning and startup, Gema provided the innovative approach to delivering the ultimate process solution for JCB.


Following the initial production startup Gema continued to provide the ongoing technical process support to ensure that the project delivered on each of the performance criteria.”


Once stationary a signal is given to the main coating panel which in turn starts the coating process. The robots equipped with bespoke Gema twin head electrostatic guns commence the coating application, following the contours of the product at pre-set target distances to ensure a constant and repeatable coating result is achieved. To maximise the coating flexibility and minimize on floor space the system can coat in three separate positions.


Key Parameter


Full project management


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capacity and is delivering 100% right first time results. Powder savings are being achieved through a combination of the improved first time transfer efficiency, the coating consistency and a vastly improved powder recovery system. When considering the environmental aspects the waste powder generated during the process has been reduced significantly, something we are delighted with. The control over the film build has helped us maintain the coating performance within our set process control


Key Parameter


Intelligent automation and robotic coating


For more information on this and other market leading Gema products please contact:


Head of Sales - Leon Hogg l.hogg@gema.eu.com or mobile 07826 551 240


Key Parameter


Significant reduction in waste and powder consumption


February 2014 SURFACE WORLD 45


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