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PAINT & POWDER COATING PRODUCTS & PROCESSES


The possibility to double productivity


The cycle time including the time for parts loading, parts transport, the shot blast process and the removal of residual blast media and dust, amounts to about 15 – 20 minutes. If necessary, this cycle time can be nearly cut in half by blasting the parts in forward and reverse transport mode. This is a highly welcome technical feature for Roald Duun: “We are thinking about expanding our job shop activities by offering shot blast sub-contracting services. Compared to manual blasting our RHBD-K shot blast machine is considerably more cost efficient”.


Media classification and dust collector on “the first floor”


The maximum payload of the hanger amounts to around two metric tons. For the transport of the parts through the blast machine Rösler expanded the existing power & free transport system of the powder coating line.


In a first step the parts to be blast cleaned are transported into the inlet chamber of the blast machine. Once the parts are in the chamber, the doors close automatically. Subsequently, the parts are traversed through the blast chamber at a defined travel speed which can be adjusted with parts specific PLC programs. The complete cleaning of the components, i.e. the removal of rust, scale and residues from the laser cutting and welding process is ensured with eight (8) Hurricane turbines; model H 42, with a power of 11 kW each. The placement of the easy to maintain single disk turbines in the shape of two rings guarantees that all surface areas of the components including the front and rear ends are perfectly cleaned and provided with an ideal surface profile of 40 to 70 micron according to the specified data required. To ensure a high uptime and long life of the blast machine, the blast chamber is fabricated from manganese


steel. In addition, in areas directly exposed to the blast stream, the blast chamber is protected with replaceable liners made from highly wear resistant steel.


The prepared components or parts are transported from the blast chamber into an outlet chamber with dimensions allowing the longest parts to fit into this outlet chamber. Once the blast process for one part or a batch of parts is complete, an optical sensor sends a signal to the PLC controller which moves the system into “reverse“. This solution became necessary, because the space constraints did not allow a complete loop of the power & free transport system through the shot blast machine and back to the machine entrance. On their way back through the blast machine the finished parts are “parked” in the inlet chamber. After the doors of the blast chamber are automatically closed, and the lighting has been turned on, the operator can enter the outlet chamber through a side door to remove residual blast media and dust from the parts with a heavy-duty vacuum cleaner, preventing carry out of blast media.


Another technical feature of the Rösler system is the integration of the dust collector and media classification system. Both were placed on the first floor by opening the ceiling between ground floor and first floor. The “back pack” solution for the dust collector resulted in valuable space savings of about 10 – 15 square meters. The standard dust collector with a residual dust load of less than 3 mg/ cubic meter was complemented by a so-called “police filter” which further reduced the residual dust load to below 1 mg. This allows the return of the cleaned air into the building during the winter season resulting in considerable savings in heating. During the summer season the cleaned air can be guided outside of the building.


For more information, please contact Sheila Jones: Telephone: +44 (0) 151 482 0444 Email: rosler-uk@rosler.com www.rosler.com


40 SURFACE WORLD February 2014 read online@ www.surfaceworld.com


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