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NEWS & VIEWS SPICE BUSINES S


RESTAURANTS CLOSE AFTER DECADES IN BUSINESS


Owner Ali Ashra has decided


to concentrate on his other restaurant, Peppers Burger. He told the Oxford Mail: “We are closing down because all the family members have grown out of this trade. I am concentrating on Peppers as Bombay is very demanding.” Another longstanding


ONE of Oxford’s oldest curry restaurants is to close after being in business for more than 50 years. The Bombay Restaurant, in Jericho, has been a favourite with residents and students since it opened in 1955.


CLOSE DOWN FOUR curry restaurants in Plymouth - Baba Indian, Mutley Spice, Barbican Balti and Vindaloo’s - have closed down over the past year. The decline is due to the economic climate, rather than any change in eating preferences by local customers, according to Syed Wahid, chairman of the Plymouth branch of the Bangladesh Caterers Association .


restaurant to close recently is the Curry House 3 in Ashtead, Surrey, which was opened by owner Mohammed Fazlul Haque in 1980, who opened his fi rst restaurant in Epsom Epsom in 1967, and a second in Ewell in 1975 The Ashtead restaurant was the last of his chain to open and the last to close. Mr Haque has decided to shut down his Ashtead business to enjoy his retirement. Patrons of the chain over the years have included newsreader Trevor McDonald, TV presenter Des O’Connor, the late actor Oliver Reed and author Howard Marks. n


PLYMOUTH RESTAURANTS Syed believes the sector will


bounce back as the economy improves and Plymouth continues to develop. He stresses there are still about 12 Indian restaurants and 20 takeaways in the Plymouth area, and other restaurant types have suffered as well. Syed says: “Curry is still the number one dish in the UK. People love their curry, so these closures are down to the economic situation.”


AN EYE FOR A DESERVING CAUSE


A RESTAURANT owner in Grimsby is raising money for an eye hospital in Bangladesh. Abdul Salique owns the Spice Of Life restaurant, and raises money for a different cause every year. He also tries to visit the recipient of his generosity in person, so that he can see how it benefi ts people. This year he is supporting


an eye hospital as more than 500,000 people in Bangladesh are blind from cataracts because they’re too poor to pay for the procedure to remove it. According to Mr Salique, “This operation costs just £25, including aftercare, which is not a lot of money to give someone the gift of sight. My aim is to raise enough money for 100 operations.” He has organised a special charity night, supported by customers, to help achieve his target. n


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