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NEWS & VIEWS SPICE BUSINES S


ARE WE MOVING ON FROM THE CHICKEN TIKKA MASALA?


quoted as saying that his Skate Cheeks Koliwada and Kala Khatta Gola Ice - blueberries, chilli, lime and salt - are amongst the most popular dishes on his menu. The reason for the willingness to experiment


is partly due to the influence travel and food programmes and also the input of TV chefs such as Madhur Jaffrey, Anjum Anand and Cyrus Todiwala. There is also a greater awareness of healthy eating in curry restaurants. Dipna Anand, of Brilliant, in Middlesex, has begun marking “Healthy Options” in little hearts on her menu. She also includes their calorific value, and finds this has led to a significant increase in orders for lower-calorie dishes, including those cooked in the tandoor. Restaurants are also fusing Indian with


AN article in the Daily Telegraph recently suggested that British diners are become more adventurous when it comes to ordering curry and may be ‘moving on ‘ from the Chicken Tikka Masala, which until recently was considered Britain’s favourite dish. While Chicken Tikka Masala is still to be found


on most menus, its popularity has, it is anecdotally reported, declined in relative terms. Comments from leading chefs such as Bobby


Patel of Prashad and Ahafiul Alom of Est. India in Southwark suggest their diners have become more ‘inquisitive’ of late. “Most of my customers are very open-minded and enjoy the culinary journey,” says Alom. Shamil Thakrar, founder of Dishoom is also


Mediterranean, French, Scottish and Japanese food, while the sector has attracted genuine innovators. Cardiff-based chef Stephen Gomes, for example, regarded by some as being “the Heston of Indian food”, has won awards at his Moksh restaurant with recipes such as Chocolate and Orange Chicken Tikka, or Hyderabadi Minced Lamb and Potato with Chilli Beetroot Foam. The article concludes by observing that,”It has been


years since British Indian restaurants were merely somewhere for “cheap spicy food to go with beer”, as Madhur Jaffrey described them on arrival in Britain in the mid-Fifties. But now they are branching out, experimenting and winning over the world in more exciting ways than ever, and we’re embracing it.” n


FILM STAR PAYS A VISIT


CANADIAN film star Ryan Gosling recently popped into The Mogul in Bagshot. His party was 9 people in total, including a mixture of close friends and family. They ordered some of The Mogul signature’s dishes such as The Mogul Supreme as well as beer, wine and champagne. Before leaving he booked again for another visit this time with an increased party of 20 people. It seems he had been recommended the restaurant by another, unnamed Hollywood star. A spokesman for The Moghul said, “Ryan is a very friendly man and didn’t mind interacting and having his picture taken.” n


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