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FEATURE SPICE BUSINES S


Gymkhana, which opened its doors last September, is a second venture for chef Karam Sethi who earned his fi rst Michelin star in 2012 at Trishna in Marylebone. The new 100 cover restaurant is inspired by the Colonial Indian gymkhana clubs, set up by the British Raj, where members of high society came to socialise and play sport. The interior design of Gymkhana, by B3 Designers, references British Raj India with ceiling fans that hang from a dark- lacquered oak ceiling, cut glass wall lamps from Jaipur, hunting trophies from the Maharaja of Jodhpur and Grandmother Sethi’s barometer. The dining room is fl anked by oak booths with marble tables and leather banquettes. Brass edged tables and rattan chairs mark the dining space. A large marble bar stands before an antique


leaded mirror, providing a backdrop to the room. Chef Sethi’s menu is described as ‘modern Indian with a focus on the tandoor oven and sigri charcoal grill.’ Signature dishes include club-style nashtas such as Duck egg and white crab bhurji, and main courses such as Achari roe deer chops, Jungli grouse, and Gilafi buffalo seekh kebab. Seasonal curries and biryanis are available, while the dessert menu features a selection of kulfi , as well as a classic Jaggery Caramel Custard.


Gymkhana features an extensive wine list and the bar serves a range of spirits, tonics and mixers from the sub-continent including Old Monk rum, Amrut whiskey and arrack produced from coconut sap. Signature punches derived from old recipes are served in wax-sealed glass bottles and there is an extensive cocktail menu. n


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