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NEWS & VIEWS SPICE BUSINES S


BUSINESSMAN TO REVAMP RESTAURANT IN MEMORY OF MOTHER


Britain’s Balti seeks EU protection


BIRMINGHAM restaurants have applied for protected name status across the European Union for the Balti curry. The Balti is a reference to the flat-


bottomed metal dishes the food is cooked and served in as well as the Pakistani immigrants to the city who hail from the region of Baltistan. The application means that, if it is successful, the name ‘Birmingham Balti; would be given protected name status under the Traditional Speciality Guaranteed (TSG) rules, which protect food that is made using traditional methods. Liberal Democrat member of European


Parliament (MEP) Phil Bennion is backing the Birmingham Balti Association’s campaign and has launched a petition in favour of the application. It is expected to be a big boost to the city’s so-called Balti Triangle if the protection is provided under the TSG provisions. n


CLEETHORPES’ biggest curry restaurant, Indian Kitchen, is to undergo an extensive makeover at the hands of local entrepreneur, Kit Singh. Kit has taken over the High Street eatery and plans to rename it Mama’s Joomla, in honour of his late mother, Satnam Kaur, who passed away last year. Plans for the venue include installing floor-to-


ceiling windows on the first floor, introducing a function room for parties and completely revamping the decor. The restaurant, which can seat 180 people, will have a total of 15 staff, comprised of ex- employees from Indian Kitchen and new recruits. Before reopening it will be extensively redecorated and refurnished. Kit, who also owns Joomla’s restaurant in


Caistor, said: “I drove past this venue with my mum earlier this year and she told me I should buy it and introduce a dance floor so people could party as well as eat! Sadly, she passed away in October, but I hope that her legacy will continue through the restaurant.” n


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