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A bright idea


By Lee Green, technical director at Kloeber UK Ltd


n the last few years roof lights and sky lights have featured heavily in building design and with good reason. Natural daylight is an essential element of any interior space but one that is still all too frequently overlooked. Often, a building will be designed with too much emphasis on its outward appearance and not enough on the interior experience, a major fac- tor of which is light. A couple of decades ago, the omission of


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light through the roof in the building’s design could have been excused as the options avail- able for homeowners to bring the suns rays into their project were restrictive, of low specification and, let’s be honest, not too easy on the eye either. Fast forward to present day and the choice of options is vast with many different types of roof light, specification levels, bespoke design options and most with aesthetically pleasing designs at sensible prices. There is now a complementary roof light product for any project that will result in daylight, that wonderful natural resource, streaming into your interior, improving light levels and lifting spirits. So which type should you consider? There


are some important questions to ask yourself on the route to choosing the correct roof light for your project.


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What type of roof do you have? If you’re building a flat roof then you would natu-


rally consider flat roof lights but pitched, hipped and lantern types might also be of interest. Flat roof lights usually have a minimal frame


that is hidden from interior view. Large glass units can be specified in this situation leaving the occupier with an unhindered view of the sky, clouds and overhanging trees and architecture above. This is particularly effective when the roof light is positioned above a seating area like a dining table for instance or in a living room. ‘Walk-on’ glazing options mean that you can still use the roof as a terrace if you wish. Pitched roof lights are also an option here and, due to their shape, can often add an element of archi- tectural interest to the design. If your roof is pitched and you have a vaulted


ceiling then mono-pitched roof lights or even those that sit at the apex (ridge) of your roof will enhance your property. Due to their bespoke nature these will absorb a little more of your budget but you will be rewarded with a signifi- cant architectural feature as a result.


Continued overleaf... selfbuilder & homemaker www.sbhonline.co.uk 55


PITCHED ROOF LIGHTS ADD BOTH HEIGHT AND LIGHT TO YOUR ROOM. A PITCHED ROOF LIGHT CAN BE DESIGNED WITH THE OPTION OF OPENING VENTS FOR ADDITIONAL AIRFLOW


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