This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
ARFF


Yeager Airport, Charleston, WV, 19 January 2010 CRJ 200 safely arrested, saving 34 lives.


SAFETY LAYER T


he Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in the US is actively working to improve runway safety areas (RSAs) at commercial airports by the end of


2015. In most airports the RSA is typically 500 feet wide and extends 1,000 feet beyond each end of the runway. It provides a graded area in the event that an aircraft overruns, undershoots, or veers off the side of the runway. However many airports were built before the current


1,000-foot RSA standard was adopted approximately 20 years ago. In some cases, it is not practicable to achieve the full standard RSA because there may be a lack of available land. There also may be obstacles such as bodies of water, highways, railroads, and populated areas or severe drop-off of terrain. The FAA began conducting research in the 1990s to determine how to improve safety at airports where the


22/ AF /January 2014


Runway technology that can safely bring an aircraft to a halt if it overshoots is now being used by more than 50 airports around the world. Gary Mason reports on how changes in regulations are allowing airports with restricted space to use the safety innovation


full RSA cannot be obtained. Working in concert with the University of Dayton, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, and Zodiac Arresting Systems, formerly known as ESCO (Engineered Arresting Systems Corp.) of Logan Township, NJ, a new technology emerged to safely arrest overrunning aircraft. The system uses crushable concrete placed at the end of a runway to stop an aircraft that overruns the runway. The tyres of the aircraft sink into the lightweight concrete and the aircraft is decelerated as it rolls through the material. This Engineered Material Arresting System (EMAS) Technology has been refined and enhanced, resulting in the latest generation of the product, EMASMAX, which has greater durability, ease of maintenance and longer product life. As of December 2013, EMASMAX systems have been installed on 81 runways at 50 airports worldwide, with the


airportfocusinternational.com


Image courtesy of Yeager Airport


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44