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BAGGAGE HANDLING


to be a part of a fully developed automated baggage handling system. The spokesman for the company which has developed the system told Airport Focus that the concept is designed so that the bags are untouched by human hand, giving less opportunity for human error, theft or terrorism. Robotics is at its best when movements and objects


are clearly pre-defined, according to Juha Tuominen, CTO of Ahkera, the Finnish company which has developed the system. “Bags have very different sizes, shapes and textures, so packing a ULD so that it is automatically packed full and the stack is stable has required a lot of innovation and intelligent software. “With Ahkera Smart Tech, you can fit baggage hall


operations in half the space. We use gravity; hence Ahkera’s patented tilt and pack method.” The company claims it has solved the issue of filling ULDs or bag trolleys to full capacity. It says the system’s fill-rate is 35 to 40 bags per AKE. It also syas the system is able to handle the bags and ULD gently and deal with the problems of segregations. The system has been designed to be a simple bolt- on retrofitted to modernise baggage hall operations, bringing much better throughput per facility footprint square metre required. It also claims the cost of bags


handled can drop substantially by using the new system alongside dedicated change management by the operator. The system is designed to receive bags from existing


sorter systems so that costly modifications to current active infrastructures will not be needed. The system is also modular and scalable to answer airport and terminal specific bag flow needs.


AF


For more information visit: www.airportfocusinternational.com


“You create space in the sorting area which is always too small and increase


speed of operations” Christoph Oftring, Crisplant


26 / AF / January 2014


airportfocusinternational.com


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