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PRODUCTS I SEE.SENSE. T


hat cyclist is Philip McAleese and his product is See.Sense., an intelligent bike light that promises to flash brighter and


faster in situations where cyclists are often missed by other road users.


Since 2011, all new cars and vans in Europe must be fitted with daylight running lights. And if something as big as a car needs lights to improve its visibility, a bicycle most definitely does too. But there’s a problem, the bright LEDs needed for daylight visibility require a large external battery pack. They’re simply too big to be practical for most cyclists.


Philip understood this. In 2012, he was a cycle commuter in busy Singapore. Like the UK, Singapore is going through a renaissance in cycling, with many people taking it up. Yet, Philip found that few drivers know how to safely interact with cyclists so they can both enjoy a safe journey.


His commute in Singapore took in


everything from Expressways, to shared pedestrian and cycle tracks and even the start and finish straight of the Singapore Formula 1 track. It gave him lots of time to think back to his days designing Air Traffic Control simulators to consider how to overcome the problems of powering bike lights. The “Eureka!” moment came when Philip was looking at the smart phone on his handlebars. He was thinking about how, in a few short years, smart technology had transformed mobile phones into connected devices with huge capabilities. He realised that he could reuse that smart technology to give lights situational awareness. This would enable them to flash brightly all the time, but with sensational brightness when the cyclist most needs to be seen. Crucially, this intelligent use of power lets the light have a long run-time without the need for a large external battery pack. The innovation doesn’t end there – Philip also looked at accident stats from around


the world. Most cycle lights focus their light into a focused beam behind the cyclist, but being hit from behind is a very rare cycling accident. So Philip incorporated a Fresnel lens (much like that found on a lighthouse), but operating in reverse to greatly disperse the light, improving side visibility. The light was launched on the crowd- funding site Kickstarter in October. It was a huge success, meeting its funding target after only 8 days with more than 850 units sold. See.Sense. is available to order now with the first deliveries scheduled for February. Readers can enjoy a 10% discount using discount code CyclingWorld10. A rear light starts at £40 and a front and rear pair starts at £70.


INFORMATION:


Seesense www.seesense.cc


February 2014 I Cycling World


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