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BRITISH HEART FOUNDATION I CYCLE TOURS


Day 2: The fi rst day of cycling will be a tough. Once into the countryside, the route passes fi elds of fruit, vegetables, sugar cane, tea and coffee. There’s a long steady climb with several downhill stretches over small river valleys. After 83km, the day ends at Thomson waterfalls, having reached the equator for the fi rst time.


Day 3: This is shorter and easier. The route leaves the town of Nyahururu and heads into the Subukia Valley. Later, the route passes through vast tea plantations before a transfer to Baringo village next to one of Kenya’s fresh water lakes.


Day 4: This day brings the most challenging section, crossing the Kerio Valley and climbing the Elgeyo escarpment. After 18km of downhill, parts of which are quite steep, gentler terrain beckons. Later comes a serious climb - 26km on winding forest roads. At the 2293m summit you will feel a huge sense of achievement and be rewarded with fantastic views across the Rift Valley.


Day 5: The penultimate cycling day


follows one of two routes from Eldoret to Kakamega, weather depending. One route entails cycling 92km on hilly tarmac roads through plantations and farms, followed by dirt tracks past small farms and villages into rainforest. The alternative is 110km of mainly road cycling before entering the Kakamega Forest Reserve which is home to colobus monkeys, fl ying squirrels and potto (the world’s slowest mammal).


Day 6: The fi nal day is mainly downhill but with some steep climbs. It offers the fi rst view of the fi nal destination, Lake Victoria. Covering 70,000 square kilometres it is the major geographical feature in this part of Africa. The day fi nishes near Kisumu, Kenya’s third largest town.


Day 7: Before the journey home, there is a transfer to the Nakuru Game Reserve, one of the last homes of the White Rhino, where there is the chance to take part in a game drive.


Day 8: On returning to Nairobi there’s an optional visit to an elephant orphanage where


calves are looked after and raised until they are ready to return to the wild in the Nairobi National Park. From there it’s homeward bound, for cyclists, arriving in the UK early the following morning.


WHY TAKE PART?


Heart disease touches us all. Every year, thousands die prematurely and those who survive can fi nd life diffi cult and frightening. The BHF is dedicated to research aimed at ending the suffering caused by heart and circulatory disease. To take on this challenge of a lifetime and help BHF fi ght for every heartbeat, you will need to pay a registration fee of £350 to secure a place and meet a fundraising target of £3,150.


TOUR INFORMATION:


To register your place on the Kenya Rift Valley Bike Ride (1-10 November 2014)


bhf.org.uk/Kenya (Itinerary provided by Classic Tours, a specialist tour operator organising and managing the Kenya Rift Valley Bike Ride on behalf of BHF).


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