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Good food and great picture opportunities at (clockwise from top) Ston Easton Park, Bath Priory and Priston Mill, and (far left) Lucknam Park


ROYAL CRESCENT Perfect for those wanting to splash out There are few places in the South West as iconic as this Bath hot spot, but forget Lizzie Bennet and Mr Darcy – this is modern day opulence, with a touch of bygone grandeur. If you’ve got a spare £27,000 to spend on your big day (Sun- Thurs during low season) then exclusive venue hire is the perfect way to ensure your day is one to remember. Now all that’s left to do is decide who you would invite to share the 45 bedrooms and head chef David Campbell’s award-winning and newly renovated Dower House restaurant, plus the spa, gym, private gardens and 110 staff! Let Sommelier Jean Marc Leitao help complement your fine-dining menu with the perfect wine flight, then take the party out into the acre of candle-lit private gardens for live music and a hog roast. ✱ www.royalcrescent.co.uk


WOOLLEY GRANGE HOTEL Perfect for the whole family Nieces, nephews or cousins: no matter who they are, having a playgroup of little ones at a wedding can sometimes prove a struggle. What will they eat? Who will keep an eye on them? Will they be safe? Thankfully Woolley Grange, a beautiful Jacobean manor house just outside Bradford on Avon, seems to have the answer. This family-friendly hotel is described as ‘informally impressive’, and it’s charming, intimate and made to measure for smaller weddings, with head chef Mark Bradbury cooking from locally sourced ingredients and the kitchen garden only. The Hen House indoor escape and Ofsted-registered crèche are the answer to every parent’s prayers, and the walled garden spa can kick off the honeymoon as you mean to go on. ✱ www.woolleygrangehotel.co.uk


crumbsmag.com


THE BATH PRIORY Perfect for a touch of glamour Fancy a wedding breakfast from a Michelin-starred kitchen? Head chef Sam Moody works closely with head gardener Jane Moore to bring to the top table all the best of the season’s offerings for your celebratory feast. Spring menus might include ravioli of Cornish lobster, breast of squab pigeon, salt marsh lamb, passion fruit soufflé and chocolate and hazelnut dacquoise. Holding a maximum of 72 guests, The Priory is the epitome of fine dining in Bath, and no doubt family and friends will be bribing you for an invite. Maybe you do need another toaster, after all… ✱ www.thebathpriory.co.uk


SAVE THE DATE Add these dates to your wedding


planner for nuptial inspiration!


WEST OF ENGLAND WEDDING SHOW 8-9 Feb 2014, UWE, 10-5pm. Admission £9. ✱ www.theukweddingshows.co.uk


PORTISHEAD WEDDING NETWORK WEDDING FAYRE 22 Feb 2014, St Peter’s Church, BS20 6PU, 11-3pm. Free to attend. ✱ www.pwnweddings.co.uk


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Keep everyone happy with a Pieminister pie for the wedding breakfast


DIY DO Don’t fancy a readymade package? Do


it yourself and create a truly bespoke day with these top local caterers…


ANISEED Let Colin Mabbutt and Sian Propert show you what they’re made of. Creative, fun and delicious menus to suit all budgets, tastes and venues. ✱ www.aniseedcatering.co.uk


FOSTERS Established in Bristol for over 50 years, this lot love weddings as much as they do food, and that’s saying something! ✱ www.fostersevents.co.uk


MCBAILE Exclusive catering for the most memorable of days. From intimate dining to blow-out banquets using the best seasonal and local fare. ✱ www.mcbaile.co.uk


PAPADELI Already know and love this Bristol deli? Sit back and let Papa take care of everything on the big day. ✱ www.papadeli.co.uk


PIEMINISTER Who doesn’t love pie? Surprise guests with a wholesome, fun and quirky meal from this local pastry powerhouse. ✱ www.pieminister.co.uk


TARA’S TABLE In need of a private chef to deliver hearty, seasonal, homemade feasts? Tara’s your girl. ✱ www.tarastable.co.uk


PHOTO BY MIKE COOPER


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