This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
56 • Digital Blonde


Learn


#FoodPorn


Karen Fewell examines why people are so keen to share their food images online


I love the shock and smiles I see on people’s faces when I tell them that people upload photos to social networks with the hashtag #FoodPorn. For some, the #FoodPorn behaviour may seem strange; for others, they consider it normal. Every 30 days you can expect to see just under 200,000 tweets that contain the hashtag #FoodPorn. It isn’t something that is only done on Twitter; take a look at Instagram, which has over 19m #FoodPorn images. You will fi nd


food images across all the social networks.


At the start of the year I looked


back at my most viewed piece of online content from 2013. It was in fact my research into why people share images of food on social networks. This has now had over 10,000 views on Slideshare and I’m regularly contacted for interviews and discussion on the topic as a direct result of the presentation. You can see the full report here at www.slideshare.net/karenfewell. I undertook the #FoodPorn


research with web psychologist Nathalie Nahai. She looks at the ways in which online environments


affect people’s behaviour and together we have begun to examine why people share food and what impact this has on society. When we asked people why they


shared food images online they told us they did it because:


1. They are proud of what they have made


2. They want to share an event, moment or special occasion


3. They see the food as a piece of art What is particularly interesting is that


food image sharing happens more often than you might think. » 65% of respondents upload an image of their food while still sat at the table. 46% do this before they even take a bite.


» 96% of respondents think it is socially acceptable to share images of food.


NATHALIE’S THOUGHTS ON THE RESEARCH FINDINGS


Why do you think we share food that we have eaten out? Photography is one of the oldest visual media, and has historically been used to document aesthetics (scenes of beauty), people and events. When you combine food, central to our survival, and art, which fulfi ls our more aesthetic needs, it becomes a very seductive mix and one which lends itself naturally to being desired, photographed and shared.


We have seen people share images of everyday food like sandwiches and salads, but what motivates people to do this?


I think that this kind of food photo


You can contact Karen with any your questions by tweeting @DigitalBlonde or emailing Karen@DigitalBlondeMarketing.com. February 2014


www.tuco.org


¬


¬


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68