This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Buildings Visited on the Tour Paradise Point Resort & Spa, originally named Vacation Village 1404 Vacation Road, Mission Bay Built: 1962 • Architects: Eldridge F. Spencer of Spencer & Lee This 44-acre tropical island village is laid out around a central lagoon. The lagoon’s landmark observation tower provides breath-taking views of Mission Bay. Although remodeled recently, the dominant eyebrow gables of the main lobby, gift shop, and convention center’s architectural style evokes a modern-day Bali resort island.


Trader Mort’s Liquor Store, originally named Hooch Hut 2904 Shelter Island Drive Built: c. 1966 • Architect: Ronald K. Davis, AIA Built on compacted fill, which was part of the original causeway connecting Loma Portal to Shelter Island. A scaled-down version of a 1950’s Daisy’s restaurant, it features a rising jonglo-inspired truncated hip roof extending out over a lanai, with reversed rafters resembling a ship’s ribs, wood shingles, lava rock-veneer, subtropical landscaping and Tiki god iconography, both inside and out.


Tikified Street Furniture Shelter Island Drive, south of Anchorage Lane Abstract wood and concrete Tiki totem poles used as street bollards, sign poles, fence posts, and sidewalk pedestrian rest area pergolas.


Stan Miller Yacht Sales, originally named Shelter Cove Marina & Yacht Sales 2540 Shelter Island Drive Built: 1963-1965 • Architect: Robert Platt Another impressive Robert Platt design, it takes Tiki Modern/Nautical to the ‘nth degree. It has all of the design features: a soaring cantilevered A-frame roof, protruding flying triangular gable, outrigger buttressing, yet without the Polynesian ebullience.


Hallmark Yacht Brokers 2525 Shelter Island Drive Built: c. 1957 • Architect: Robert Platt One of the few two-story Polynesian Maritime Modern style buildings on Shelter Island, its character-defining features include a cross-gable wood


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20