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Remote Start, Right and Wrong


Trusted Tech winner Steve Ledford emphasizes that the main factor in a fully functional remote start install has little to do with the actual product


The T in T-Tap stands for ‘Temporary’


Tis is the improper way to install any electrical component into a vehicle. Tis is a picture of a troubleshooting job that came to me after the customer became uncomfortable returning to the retailer where the install was originally done. Te true purpose for the t-tap is a temporary means of making an emergency electrical repair until a time when the proper repair can be made, such as in military vehicles in the field.


Clear the area


Te first step I take in a remote start installation is to remove all of the nec- essary panels around the area I will be working. I then identify all connection locations to begin bench wiring the unit for installation.


Your wiring: concise & compact When bench wiring a system you should first identify which wires


you will not need for your particular installation. You would then cut and tape those wires up. I do not recommend un-pinning them from the harness in case you may have removed a wire by mistake or may need to add a feature to the system in the future. Make as many of your connections on the bench with solder and heat shrink to help keep the harness clean in the vehicle. Once all of that is complete you can then zip-tie the harness for vehicle installation. I like to use this step to tie the wires in the harness off in bundles based on the direc- tion that they will have to go in the vehicle.


56 Mobile Electronics  January 2014


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