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of limitations begins to run for unjust enrichment where the tortfeasor is also a corporate officer or accountant of the tort victim corporation.


915-02157 Richard A. Welshans, et al. v. Sandy Spring Bank


Harry M. Rifkin, Esq. (410) 779-91940


Breach of fiduciary duty


The Honorable Ronald A. Silkworth Circuit Court for Anne Arundel County


Appellant-plaintiff, owners and managers of a coffee shop, filed suit against a bank which was responsible for submitting an application to the Small Business Administration for an SBA loan. Appellant-plaintiff allege that the bank falsified data and failed to perform due diligence in the preparation of the application, causing Appellant-plaintiff to be in violation of Maryland law. The question on appeal is whether the bank owes Appellant-plaintiff a duty of care and whether


the bank breached the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing.


916-2128 Carolyn Allen, et al. v. Leonardo Rivera


Michael C. Robinett, Esq. (202) 628-30520


Negligent entrustment, automobile accident


The Honorable Marcus Z. Shar Circuit Court for Baltimore City


This case arises from a motor vehicle collision. On appeal, Appellant-plaintiff challenge the trial court’s grant of summary judgment on the negligent entrustment count, arguing that the tortfeasor testified at deposition that he had Appellee’s permission to use the vehicle and that the Appellee gave him the keys on the day of the car crash. Appellant-plaintiff further argues that Appellee knew or should have known that the tortfeasor was impaired from alcohol consumption and that he would likely drive the vehicle in a manner involving unreasonable risk of physical harm to others.


58 Trial Reporter / Winter 2014


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