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EXCERPT


PLYOMETRICS USING with Other Training But plyometrics is not a panacea in athletic conditioning. It does


An excerpt from Plyometrics by Donald A. Chu and Gregory Myer


Learn how plyometrics can be utilized within training for a number of different sports in Plyometrics.


Using plyometrics With Other Training Jump training and upper-body plyometrics are relevant to


many sports. Gymnastics, diving, volleyball, and jumping events in track and field are all arenas where success depends on the athlete’s ability to explode from the standing surface and gener- ate vertical velocity, linear velocity, or both in order to achieve the desired result.


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not exist in a vacuum, nor should it be thought of as a singular form of training. Instead, plyometrics is the icing on the cake—to be used by athletes who have prepared their tendons and muscles (through resistance training) for the tremendous impact forces imposed in high-intensity plyometrics. Anaerobic conditioning, in the form of sprint or interval train- ing, is essential to developing the stride patterns required in proper plyometric bounding. The explosive reactions of sprinting or of movement drills that require changes of direction can be performed as part of interval training (repeated efforts with measured recovery periods).


Done together, resistance training and anaerobic training help


prepare the athlete’s body for plyometrics. In turn, plyometric train- ing enhances the athlete’s ability to perform in resistance exercise and anaerobic activity—a true partnership in athletic training.


Resistance Training Resistance training is the ideal counterpart to plyometric train- ing because it helps prepare the muscles for the rapid impact loading


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