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JANET FITCH


LINES Magic and science are the inspiration behind EA BURNS’ new collection Ancient Rites along with science fi ction, architecture, dinosaurs and religious iconography. The designer, Lizzie Burns started to design jewellery in recycled leather in 2011 but now uses Rhodoid, a bio-plastic, with recycled silver and 18c gold vermeil. Her statement pieces include the Climb necklace in hand-worked Rhodoid with coated brass detailing, the Span the Depth earrings and the Reach ring. (www.eaburns.com)


FIORELLI has launched a new silver collection with 60 designs ‘inspired by an eclectic mix of monumental architecture, organic silhouettes and sharp geometry.’ The


Geometric range sees ‘order and form take precedence, with a feminine twist.’ (www.fi orellijewellery.com)


Amanda Gerbasi is the designer responsible for KATTRI contemporary jewellery, which introduced its debut ‘Geometry Collection’ at London Fashion Week S/S14. The simple but sophisticated oversized studs, most glamorously worn by Pixie Lott at the Attitude Awards, are bold, clean lined and update any outfi t. (www.kattri.com)


DESIGN In June, earlier this year I mentioned the work of Royal College of Art student and member of the RCA Jewellery and Siversmithing collective, ‘Moving On’, Danyi Zhu. Recently I went to THEO FENNELL’S elegant fl agship Chelsea store to see the winning designs and designers of the Theo Fennell RCA Awards 2013, showcased there. I was delighted to learn that Danyi Zhu had won the Best Work in Jewellery Award, before heading off to her native Beijing to continue her career. (www.theofennell.com)


Winner of the Overall Excellence prize was SOFIE BOONS who describes herself as an alchemical jeweller, with a project resulting in a new material combining resin and Nano gold particles, perfume containers that rethink the application of perfume, and a recipe book of wearable solid perfumes. (www.sofi eboons.com)


EVENTS November is a busy month of pre-Christmas events, starting with Handmade in Britain, off ering a varied choice of contemporary craft, including more than 30 UK jewellers. The New Graduate Showcase highlights emerging makers, and ANNA BYERS, who set up her own company at the end of 2012 is one of them. She was one of the Kickstarters at IJL 2013, showing her Interactive collection that explores geometric forms that can


be rotated and re-arranged to


the wearer’s own liking. (Handmade in Britain, Chelsea Old Town Hall, 8-10 November www.handmadeinbritain.co.uk) (www.annabyers.com)


Enamelling, that most skilful of arts, is celebrated in Heart of the Heat, an exhibition of work by 60 of Britain’s leading enamellers, from 11 November to 13 December 2013 at the School of Jewellery, Birmingham. Sponsored by the Goldsmiths’ Company, this combined initiative of the British Society of Enamellers and the Guild of Enamellers shows the work of two Goldsmiths’ Liverymen, Jane Short and Fred Rich, as well as the Guild of Enamellers’ Bursary Award Winner, SCARLETT COHEN-FRENCH, a graduate of Glasgow School of Art. (www.thegoldsmiths.co.uk) (www.guildofenamellers.org)


KATH LIBBERT Jewellery Gallery at Salts Mill near Bradford, West Yorkshire is holding an exhibition of nine new graduate jewellers from UK universities. Coinciding with my geometric theme, Tracey Falvey, a graduate of Plymouth College of Art, is exhibiting her box shaped rings of recycled silver and paint. (Fragments, 14 November 2013 to 26 January 2014 www.kathlibbertjewelleryco.uk)


White is the theme of Contemporary Applied Arts’ Christmas exhibition in Southwark, London from 21 November to 24 December, with dazzling white jewellery from makers like Jane Adam’s silver bangles, Sarah King’s bright white bio resin bangles and Nina Bukvic’s 18c and 9c white gold and white diamonds pendant and earrings. (www.caa.org.uk)


November 2013 | jewelleryfocus.co.uk


Jewellery Focus | 27


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