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healthy babies


BY AWHONN EDITORIAL STAFF


Do You See What I See?


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While most parents can reasonably expect that their infant or toddler gets an overall health screen each time they go for a well-child check, there’s one important assessment that no child should miss because it’s free and can save your child from both vision and learning diffi culties down the road. A free InfantSEE® eye exam between the ages of 6 and 12 months is available in every state, yet


YOUR BABY’S DEVELOPING VISION MONTHS BY 2


Sees objects about 12” away


Sees moving objects Reaches for objects


Eye movement and body coordination skills develop


MONTHS BY 4


Both eyes should focus equally





Help baby develop bilateral and binocular vision by moving both sides of your baby’s body at once, such as moving her arms or legs at the same time. You probably already play this way with baby.


 Use a nightlight in baby’s room  Move the crib around the room, and your baby’s sleeping position in it regularly


 Talk to baby as you walk around her  Alternate feeding her from her right or left side


 Hang a mobile above and outside of her crib  Keep toys within reach (8”-12”) when playing with her


MONTHS BY 6


Continued eye-body coordination skills development


Eye contact starts to replace physical contact


Uses both eyes to judge distances


BY 8-12 MONTHS


Source: American Optometric Association


 Encourage baby to crawl and explore


 Play “patty cake” and “peek-a- boo” with your baby


 Help baby play with stacking and take-apart toys


 Give baby toys to touch, hold, and manipulate


VISION ASSESSMENT IS AN ESSENTIAL INFANT HEALTH CHECK


only 13% of all new parents take advantage of this public health vision program in baby’s fi rst year. 1 in 10 babies will have vision problems by the time they’re preschoolers, and if caught and corrected early, many common eye problems can be fi xed. Find an InfantSEE® care provider for your baby’s free vision assessment during his fi rst year at InfantSEE.org.


About 1 in 10 preschoolers have vision problems, according to the American Public Health Association, but your preschooler doesn’t know the difference. Watch for these signs that may warrant a needed eye exam:


 Squinting  Tilting their head


 One or both of the eyes turning in or out


 Sensitivity to light


 Short attention span for the child’s age


 Sitting close to toys, holding a book too close, or sitting close to the TV


 Frequently rubbing their eyes


 Difficulty with eye-hand-body coordination when playing


 Avoiding any detailed activities, like stacking blocks, coloring or puzzles


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ISSUE 12 / Fall 2013 Healthy Mom&Baby 49


WATCH FOR VISION PROBLEMS


time for baby’s vision exam.


Ideal


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