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healthy pregnancy


positions are the ones that work for you and your baby. Regardless of which positions you choose, make sure your baby is well supported and facing your breast.


5. MANY MOMS JUST DON’T MAKE ENOUGH MILK ‘Not enough milk’ is every mom’s fear. It’s also a top reason moms say they stop breastfeeding sooner rather than later. While it’s hard to measure what you can’t see, poopy diapers and weight gain will let you know your baby is getting enough to eat.


6. INADEQUATE WEIGHT GAIN IS COMMON Knowing how much weight babies typically lose and gain during their first weeks of life can help you know if your baby is gaining too little or too much


weight: � Newborns lose, on average, 5% of their birth


weight during the first 5 days after birth. � Some babies lose as little as 2% or as much as 7%–10%. Weight loss greater than 10% or continued weight loss after day 5 can be cause for


concern. � Most babies are back to their birth weight by 10 days of age and gain between 4–8 ounces a week during the remainder of the first 3 months.


7. A LOT OF BREASTFED BABIES WILL NEED FORMULA SUPPLEMENTS Despite compelling evidence of the benefits of exclusive breastfeeding, work, school demands, illness, pain and low milk supply are among the many reasons mothers give for feeding formula.


30 health4mom.org


Te fact is, most mothers are able to breastfeed their babies exclusively, both by nursing and bottle- feeding breastmilk. Although formula supplements are widely used, they’re seldom medically indicated.


8. HOW MUCH MILK YOU PUMP IS HOW MUCH MILK YOU MAKE How much milk a mother expresses from her breasts is seldom a reflection of how much milk she makes at a feeding. In the beginning, you may only get enough milk to cover the bottom of the collection container. Don’t worry. It can take days or weeks before you see an increase in how much you can pump.


9. YOU NEED TO WAIT AT LEAST 2 HOURS AFTER YOU PUMP TO BREASTFEED Te same rule that applies to breastfeeding applies to pumping: Watch your baby, not the clock, and feed your baby at the first sign of hunger. Tere is no need to wait for even one minute after pumping before feeding your child. In fact, the more milk you remove from your breasts by breastfeeding or pumping, the more milk you will make.


10. ‘NO LEAKING’ MEANS ‘NO MILK’ Milk leaking from your breasts is a sure sign that your body is making milk. Now you just need to get the milk out of your breasts and into your baby. Once your baby acquires a feeding routine (about 6–12 weeks of age), leaking usually stops. Don’t panic! You’re not losing your milk. Your breasts have simply learned how much milk to make and when to make it.


The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that breastfeeding should begin within 1 hour of birth and should be “on demand”—as often as the baby wants (day and night). Avoid bottles and pacifiers until baby is breastfeeding well.


AMY SPANGLER, MN, RN, IBCLC, is an internationally recognized breastfeeding and child nutrition expert. Find her online at Babygooroo.com.


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