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healthy pregnancy


Busting the top


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1. ENGORGEMENT IS NORMAL It’s easy to confuse breast fullness, which is normal, with breast engorgement, which can hint at a problem that will only worsen if ignored. If feedings are infrequent, delayed or missed, your breasts can overfill and engorgement can occur. Classic signs of engorgement include swollen, hot, painful breasts and a low-grade fever. Engorgement is best prevented by breastfeeding early (as soon as possible after birth) and often.


2. PAIN IS NORMAL Many new mothers describe breastfeeding as “painful.” Any discomfort that you feel should be at the start of a feeding and last only a few seconds. If the pain persists throughout the feeding, it


myths about Breastfeeding


BY AMY SPANGLER, MN, RN, IBCLC


“BREASTFEEDING IS NATURAL.” SOUND FAMILIAR? IF YOU ASSUME


THAT BREASTFEEDING IS NATURAL, IT DOESN’T TAKE A LEAP OF FAITH TO


ACCEPT THAT BREASTFEEDING MUST BE EASY. WHY THEN DO SO MANY


MOTHERS DESCRIBE BREASTFEEDING AS HARD?


10 )


Know that myths masquerading as facts can undermine the success of even the most ardent mom. Learn to separate fact from fiction and you will gain the knowledge and confidence you need to meet your breastfeeding goals.


can signal a poor latch. Remove your baby from the breast and try again. Breastfeeding “through the pain” will only result in a still- hungry baby and a damaged nipple.


3. BABIES CRY WHEN THEY NEED TO BE FED Babies cry for many reasons. While it’s true that your baby’s cry can signal hunger, crying is a late sign of hunger. Watch, instead, for early cues such as sucking on fingers or fists, smacking lips, squirming and fussing, and feed your baby before she cries.


4. LATCH IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN POSITION Position and latch go hand-in-hand. It’s hard to achieve a good latch when your baby is poorly positioned. Te best breastfeeding


ISSUE 12 / Fall 2013 Healthy Mom&Baby 29


Breast milk gives infants all the nutrients they need for healthy development.


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