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Volume 44, Number 10 ✦ October 2013 INSIDE: What’s


Lions Club to host spaghetti dinner ...12


Matching grant donation helps HOAs fund power line fight


Bill Gates The generosity of developer Ed Robson


has helped the three Sun Lakes homeowners associations gear up for a legal fi ght over high voltage power lines. Salt River Project (SRP) has identifi ed Hunt


Highway/Price Road as one of two possible routes for a 230,000-volt line, mounted on 130-foot tall utility poles - twice the size of standard poles. Many Sun Lakes residents feel


Desert


Artists’ Art Walk ...28


“Cinema and Soundtracks” 8 week course ...43


these huge poles are inappropriate for high density population areas, and fear they would hurt property values, harm views, and present health risks. The three HOAs have united


to fi ght the SRP project and have hired an attorney to represent our interests. When Mr. Robson heard of the


effort, he pledged to match - dollar for dollar - individual contributions to the legal fund up to $10,000. Later he increased the offer to $15,000. Homeowners


so far have


Welcome Back Shutterbugs ...64


contributed more than $17,000 - more than enough to access the full pledge. “Mr. Robson’s generosity has enabled us to go into this fi ght with enough funds to mount a strong campaign,” said Jean Tolar, second vice president of the Sun Lakes Country Club HOA and a member of the STOPPP coordinating committee.“This came at exactly the right time.” STOPPP (Standing Together Opposed to Power Pole Pollution) is the umbrella group of the three


From left, Charlene Petragallo, Kathy Skrei and Jean Tolar, representatives of the three Sun Lakes HOAs, accept Ed Robson’s generous $15,000 matching grant to help fund a legal fight over high voltage power lines. (Photo by Linda Caton, Cottonwood/Palo Verde).


HOAs. Cooperating with it is COOP


(Citizens Opposing Overhead Power lines), an independent citizens group. With the more than $17,000 contributed


by homeowners, Mr. Robson’s $15,000 match and $25,000 put up by the three Sun Lakes HOAs, the legal fund now has more


than $57,000. “This is a great start,” said Kathy Skrei,


president of the Cottonwood-Palo Verde HOA. “It will enable us to have a strong legal presence during the upcoming line siting process. We owe Mr. Robson a debt


— POWER LINE cont. on page 22


PVLGA prepares for Fall ..78


Index:


Generals ........................ 2 Features ...................... 32 In Passing .................... 33 Taste of the Town ....34-35 Destinations................. 42 Clubs ........................... 44 Sports .......................... 75 Religion ....................... 81 Calendars ...............88-90 Classifi eds ..............91-99


We’re back at it this fall and winter so please join us beginning November 4 and 8 for a series of relaxed, twice weekly bicycle rides exploring Sun Lakes’ network of roads and perhaps some neighboring ones if that’s what it takes to fi nd a mid - or post-ride coffee shop. These hour and a half to two hour tours will launch from the fl ag pole at the Cottonwood Clubhouse every Monday and Friday afternoon at 1:00 p.m., returning by 3:00 p.m. unless we’re having too much fun to stop. The program is conducted under auspices of t the Phoen Phoenix Metro Bicycle


conduc d auspic


of


Bicycle Clu Club and is free of charge; to


free of but,


but control


group s e a group size and make


mak


unde he


pp g t


h e


 


certain no one’s left behind, registration is necessary by 5:00 p.m. of the day prior to the ride. Groups are limited to a maximum of 12 riders. Monday is “Soft Spoke’N” day, designed to cover eight to 10 essentially traffi c-free miles and afford the leaders plenty of time to answer questions about bikes, offer cycling tips and demonstrate safe riding skills. The plan for Friday’s “Out Spoke’N” rides is more demanding; these will go about 16-20 miles and work on becoming comfortable sharing the road with motor vehicles. Friday rides may occasionally start from locations other than Cottonwood to explore places unreachable from the clubhouse within a 20 mile round trip. These off campus rides will, as measured from their starting locations, still be subject to a 16-20 mile limit.


g;


and work on b com e roa


mo may o on


her t an Cot o nreacha le from


s me ocat


Helmets are required fo for these rides, fancy bikes are not. Hybrid, comfort


bikes, or mountain bikes are recommended but, road bikes are perfectly acceptable. To register send an e-mail to lee.evans675@


gmail.com or call 408-802-6824. Leaders Bob and Lee Evans, Sun Lakes


residents, have over 60 years cycling experience between them. For the past 13 years they’ve conducted programs similar to the above in the Boston suburbs and last winter initiated a similar program in Sun Lakes. Both are certifi ed cycling instructors, retired racers, ex- bicycle commuters and former off-road crazies who now confi ne their riding to civilized surfaces. Check out their website at www. getupngoadventures.com for a glimpse of what their New England summertime rides were like. Email Lee at lee.evans675@gmail.com if you have questions. 


October 19 An “all small paintings” show will be held on Saturday, October 19, from 9:30


It’s A Small World art show Lee a d B b E e and Bob Evans


a.m.-2:00 p.m. in the Oakwood Painting Room. Artists with larger paintings will be in the Oakwood Arts and Crafts courtyard. Please stop by before or after visiting the IronOaks Open House.


www.sunlakessplash.com 


PRSRT STD. U.S. POSTAGE PAID


CHANDLER, AZ PERMIT NO. 60


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