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ELCOMETER


New Elcometer 456 Ultra/Scan Probe


Ever since the launch of the first coating thickness gauge in the 1940’s, individual thickness measurements have been used to calculate a coating’s average (x), highest and lowest dry film thickness values so that they could be compared to a coating’s specification.


In the mid 1980’s, digital coating thickness gauges which could


automatically calculate statistics were


introduced – allowing inspectors to assess a coating much more efficiently.


stand: 59


Over the past 3 decades coating thickness gauges have become much more


powerful, making coating inspection


easier, more accurate and repeatable than ever before.


The Elcometer 456 coating thickness gauge, for example, enables users to automatically compare thickness values to a coating’s specification, display run charts, store individually time and date stamped thickness readings into memory. The gauges can even transfer data wirelessly to a mobile cell phone, recording the phone’s GPS coordinates of precisely where the measurement was taken.


Standard test methods today typically require inspectors to take a number of individual spot measurements over the coated surface. Whilst gauge measurement speeds have increased significantly (almost doubling to in excess of 70 readings per minute in the


per minute – dramatically speeding up the measurement of a coated ferrous (F) or non-ferrous (NF) metal substrate.


Each Ultra/Scan probe has been designed to take a ‘snap on’


replaceable end cap, so that the sliding action required to achieve a scan of a coated surface does not cause any wear to the probe tip, crucial to maintaining the accuracy of the probe over its life.


The Elcometer 456 Digital Coating Thickness Gauge


Elcometer 456) it is the historical design of a coating thickness gauge which has determined the time taken for an Inspector to carry out a coating thickness inspection as the gauge requires the probe to be lifted off the surface in between each measurement.


Introducing the new Elcometer 456 with Ultra/Scan Probes


The Elcometer 456 Ultra/Scan Probe


Elcometer’s new Ultra/Scan Probes for the Elcometer 456 Coating Thickness Gauges not only allows Inspectors to drag the probe across a coated surface without damaging the probe or the coating, but also increases the reading rate of the Elcometer 456 coating thickness gauge to in excess of 140 readings


130 SURFACE WORLD september 2013 - show issue


Using the Elcometer 456’s patented offset feature, the thickness of the cap is excluded


from any coating thickness measurement and, as the cap wears during use, this wear effect is also accounted for. The gauge will even display a warning message when the wear cap needs to be replaced.


The Elcometer 456 Ultra/Scan probe can be used as a traditional coating thickness probe or can be used to measure in either Scan or Auto Repeat Modes.


Scan Mode


When selected, Scan Mode allows users to slide the Ultra/Scan probe over the entire surface area. As the probe is lifted off the surface, the gauge not only displays the average (x) coating thickness,


Scan Mode (continued on page 132) follow us on Twitter @surfaceworldmag


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