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THE INSTITUTE OF MATERIALS FINISHING


The IMF launches Engineering Technician, Incorporated


Engineer and Chartered Engineer The Institute of


Materials Finishing is delighted to announce the “rejuvenation” of our links with the Engineering Council and a fresh programme of international


professional recognition.


The three levels of significant status are EngTech, IEng & CEng and an aid to selecting the correct level for you is as follows:-


Engineering Technicians are concerned with applying proven techniques and procedures to the solution of practical engineering problems. They carry supervisory or technical responsibility, and are competent to exercise creative aptitudes and skills within defined fields of technology. Professional Engineering Technicians contribute to the design, development, manufacture, commissioning, decommissioning, operation or maintenance of products, equipment, processes or services. Professional Engineering Technicians are required to apply safe systems of working.


Incorporated Engineers maintain and manage applications of current and developing technology, and may undertake engineering design, development, manufacture, construction and operation. Incorporated Engineers are variously engaged in technical and commercial management and possess effective interpersonal skills.


stand: KC4


Chartered Engineers are characterised by their ability to develop appropriate solutions to engineering problems, using new or existing technologies, through innovation, creativity and change. They might develop and apply new technologies, promote advanced designs and design methods, introduce new and more efficient production techniques, marketing and construction concepts, or pioneer new engineering services and management methods. Chartered Engineers are variously engaged in technical and commercial leadership and possess effective interpersonal skills.


To quote from the Engineering Council’s document “UK-SPEC”:


“Professional engineering is not just a job – it is a mindset and sometimes a way of life. Engineers use their judgement and experience to solve problems when the limits of scientific knowledge or mathematics are evident. Their constant intent is to limit or eliminate risk.


128 SURFACE WORLD september 2013 - show issue


Their most successful creations recognise human fallibility. Complexity is a constant companion.


The engineering profession in the UK is well respected internationally. Individuals aspiring to be recognised as professional engineers and engineering technicians often need independent assessment of their competence. The UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC) provides the means to achieve this. Even for those whose reputation is secure, the process of registration offers a means to demonstrate recognition by one’s peers, and an encouragement to others.


The Engineering Council’s registrants include Engineering Technicians, Incorporated Engineers and Chartered Engineers and the skills of each of them are needed within an engineering team. Achievement of registration in each category is valuable recognition in its own right. Life-long learning and career development may also enable individuals to progress within the registration structure, from Engineering Technician to Incorporated Engineer and from Incorporated Engineer to Chartered Engineer. Evidence of competence is the key requirement for progression, and normally there will be a need for additional education and training to enable progression to be recognised, although this may vary in nature.


Today’s engineering professionals demonstrate a personal and professional commitment to society, to their profession, and to the environment. This is reflected in the standard for all three registration categories.”


To discover more about these new qualifications contact David Meacham at david@materialsfinishing.org or ring the IMF on 0121 622 7387


read online @ www.surfaceworld.com


WE ARE EXHIBITING AT SURFACE WORLD 2013


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