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EQUIP (MIDLANDS) LIMITED


EQUIP CAN HELP BRING COST-EFFECTIVE PRODUCTION BACK TO THE UK


Brilliant news for UK manufacturing – Equip (Midlands) Ltd offers a cost-effective, highly automated robotic solution for production processes that until now have only been viable abroad.


Thanks to Equip’s role as UK agents for DAN Technologies, the company can deliver the patented Perfect Polishing Pressure (PPP) system to help achieve optimum grinding and polishing results for the best possible price.


Equip’s close partnership allows it to draw on DAN Technologies’ 30 years-plus experience of producing automated robotic cells for grinding, satin finishing and mirror polishing using the very latest technology.


With more than 1,000 systems operating worldwide, the companies’ combined expertise helps customers bring processes into production quickly and successfully at a realistic and competitive rate.


Extensive expertise across a broad range of products and industries - covering a wide variety of materials such as polyester, wood, mild steel, stainless steel, brass, aluminium and titanium -


means Equip is perfectly placed to steer customers through a full development project, from start to finish.


PPP constantly monitors and adjusts grinding and polishing pressure to create the perfect finish whatever the material, providing consistent quality and extending consumable life thus reducing costs. The system’s flexibility enables it to switch between and fulfil different production needs.


Equip’s qualified and responsive technical experts can guide you through a huge spectrum of automated grinding and polishing projects from conception to completion, ensuring full development support from a skilled team that customers can count on and trust.


Call Equip now on (01298) 22233 to discover how you can bring manufacturing back to the UK and achieve the high standards you expect – without breaking the bank.


BRITISH COATINGS FEDERATION


Coatings Industry reports record low injury rates


stand: KC6


Figures recently released by the British Coatings Federation (BCF) show


record low injury rates among its


members, which include the manufacturers of coatings, printing inks, and wallcoverings.


On average there are six injuries per 1,000 employees, which is 50% lower than it was 15 years ago, and tracks below general manu- facturing injury rates.


These statistics are collected as part of BCF’s Coatings Care, a voluntary programme which benchmarks the health, safety and environmental performance of the paint and printing ink manufacturing sites in the UK and promotes best practice.


Wayne Smith, BCF’s Director of Regulatory Affairs, commented “Given that one of the key objectives of the Programme is to improve the performance of the coatings industry in the field of safety, we are of course delighted that we can be seen as leading the way in reducing injury rates.”


The British Coatings Federation is the sole Trade Association representing the UK paints, printing inks, powder coatings and wallcoverings manufacturers.


Wayne Smith,


Director of Regulatory Affairs, BCF


126 SURFACE WORLD september 2013 - show issue


For further information, please contact either Alison Brown or Charlotte Webb at the BCF, alison.brown@bcf.co.uk, charlotte.webb@bcf.co.uk, telephone 01372 365989 www.coatings.org.uk


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WE ARE EXHIBITING AT SURFACE WORLD 2013


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