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INDUSTRY AWARENESS ZONE – PROGRAMME 10:30 – 11:00


Wednesday 25th Safetykleen UK Ltd.


September 2013 Speaker - Rob Walker “Managing your hazardous waste – a waste management company perspective”


Highlighting the basic costs of waste from the purchase of raw materials through to the loss of end product, the costs of waste are many times more than just the disposal costs you see in your bill.


The seminar will also cover the main points of the Waste Hierarchy - reduce, reuse, recycle, recover and disposal and how this works with the common waste that waste companies collect.


There will also be a review of the current technologies available, demonstrate measures to manage waste and a look at existing guidance, reference sources, as well as future developments.


11:10 – 11:40 Dyne Technology Ltd.


Speaker - Mr Chris Lines; Managing Director “Plasma Surface Preparation. What is it? What can it do for you?”


With over 35 years’ experience working in Industrial Automation and Plasma/Corona Surface Treatment, Chris has helped many manufacturing companies throughout the UK & Ireland. With his eagerness to help Chris is widely recognised as the person to speak to if you want to solve the problems of achieving good adhesion.


Plasma surface treatment is commonly used throughout the manufacturing world in automotive, aerospace, motor sport, medical device manufacturing, pipes, extrusions and cable industries etc., to clean and activate a surface prior to bonding, printing, coating, painting, laminating. So what exactly is plasma surface preparation and what can it do for you? During his presentation Chris will discuss:


What are the ideal surface properties needed to ensure optimum adhesion is achieved? (Dispelling the myths and common misconceptions.)


How to improve adhesion performance through the use of Atmospheric or Vacuum Plasma surface treatments.


Plasma surface treatment may be able to help you solve problems of adhesion, see the presentation and find out more.


11:50 – 12:20 DeFelsko Corporation. Speaker - David Beamish “Replica Tape – A Source of New Surface Profile Information”


In the protective coatings industry, replica tape is widely used for quantifying surface profile. However, as with most other means of field measurement, replica tape determines only maximum profile height. Other measures of surface texture, no less meaningful, can be obtained using electron or confocal microscopes or interferometric laser profilers, but these large, complex, and expensive instruments are unsuitable for field use.


Replica tape provides a reverse copy of a blast cleaned steel surface. This Paper re-examines replica tape as a source of the surface profile parameters required by coatings professionals. It explains how it is possible to obtain valuable new information from replica tape including profile height, peak count, peak density and increase in surface area (rugosity) using simple, low cost field devices.


10 SURFACE WORLD september 2013 - show issue


read online @ www.surfaceworld.com


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