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industry are employed in the businesses that are going to provide a positive experience and support and grow those individuals working for them. In some businesses language is going to be a problem and we will need to take a fresh look at how easy it would be for someone to work in businesses who might not necessary be from the ethnic background of the particular restaurant. Whilst challenging, these problems can easily be overcome and provide a new opportunity to showcase the industry to the wider public. The Asian and Oriental Centres of Excellence will be up and running from February 2012, but there are opportunities to recruit apprentices now.


Last year, Bangladeshi, Indian, Chinese and Thai routes were introduced into the Professional Cookery Apprenticeship. This means that whilst an apprentice is working in a restaurant they will also be developing their skills and knowledge through structured training.


Apprenticeships offer a number of advantages: • The first is that it has been proven to provide a return on investment after only one year • The second is that whilst the apprentice is going through their apprenticeship and developing their skills and knowledge, they are eligible to be paid an apprenticeship rate, which for some employers provides an added incentive. • Both the new Asian and Oriental Centres of Excellence and


the apprenticeships provide an easy, practical solution to recruiting skilled chefs. By using these routes, employers are investing in the continued vitality and vibrancy of the Asian and Oriental industry by ensuring we have the workforce we need for tomorrow.


Martin-Christian Kent Research & Policy Director People 1st Exceeding the average standards r u t i


Md. Kobir Tel: 07792 419 060 Fair Folds Farm, Wood Cockhill, St Albans, Hertfordshire AL4 9HG 38  The Bangladesh Cuisine Curry & Tandoori | Volume 11 | December 2011


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