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Sun A THE Alpha: Diver down


CODE OF THE SEA


International maritime signal flags have been used by boaters since 1857 when the British Board of Trade created the Commercial Maritime Code. That code contained 18 different signal flags that could create tens of thousands of messages in various combinations. The code used today is an extended version of the Commercial Maritime Code called the International Code of Symbols (ICS), and it contains 26 alphabet letters, ten numbers, three repeater flags and an answering flag.


The alphabet flags each have


their own meaning; for example the “C” or “Charlie” flag also means “affirmative”. When used in combination with other flags, they create a code; for example when the “N” or “November” flag is flown with the “C” flag it means “I am in distress”.


As a community that lives on


the water, these are good flags to know and learn. Here’s the key… now happy decoding!


46 NORTHBEACHSUN.COM NEWS, EVENTS, VIDEO & MORE 7 8 9 0 FALL 2013 Z Zulu: Require a tug 1 2 B


Bravo: Dangerous cargo


C Charlie: Affirmative D Delta: Keep clear E


Echo: Altering course to starboard


F Foxtrot: Disabled


G Golf: Want a pilot


H Hotel: Pilot on board


I


India: Altering course to port


J


Juliet: On fire; keep clear


K


Kilo: Desire to communicate


L Lima: Stop instantly


M Mike: I am stopped


N November: Negative


O Oscar: Man overboard


P Papa: About to sail


Q


Quebec: My vessel is heatlhy


R


Romeo: The way is off my ship


S


Sierra: Engines going astern


T


Tango: Keep clear of me


U


Uniform: You are running into danger


V


Victor: Require assistance


W


Whiskey: Require medical assistance


X


X-ray: Stop your intention


Y


Yankee: Am dragging anchor


3


4


5


6


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