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COMMUNITY


Every summer the languages of the world seem to become a part of Outer Banks life as exchange students from around the world come here to work. We thought it would be fun to talk to some of them and get a glimpse into what brought them here and what life was like back home.


What we found is that these are really great kids, that in spite of all of our


differences in culture and language, these are like college kids anywhere at any time—curious about the world around them, open to new experiences and ready to take on new challenges.


Elena Arabadji, 23 Chisinau, Moldova (Capital)


Ralitsa Nedelcheva, 20 Burgas, Bulgaria


Why did you choose to come to the OBX? I originally had a job offer on Nantucket Island but one week before departure, received an email withdrawing job. Heard of job with Judy and came to the Outer Banks.


What did you study in your country? International Economic Relations. I worked for the past two years at the Burgas Airport.


Where do you work? Life on a Sandbar in Nags Head


What do you find most confusing about living here? Transportation is confusing sometimes.


What do you miss most about home? My sister, Elena, is 15. She just started high school. She’s a ballerina and she plays piano.


What American food do you like the best? The food here is good. I like the food.


What do you most enjoy about living on the OBX? It feels good here. It’s not a big difference to Burgas. (Located on the Black Sea, one of Burgas’ primary industries is tourism. -Editor)


Why did you choose to come to the OBX? This is my second time in the United States. Last year I was in Massanutten. This year I liked to see the Ocean.


What is your major in school? Studying law at the State University of Moldova


Where do you work? Kill Devil Hills Dairy Queen


What do you find most surprising about living here? Everything closes at night. In my country everything stays open all night long. Also the first time I came here, I could not exchange my money. In my country you can exchange money on every corner.


What do you miss most about home? Everything is a long distance. In my country you do not need a car.


What American food do you like the best? In America I like a lot of stuff. But I don’t like peanut butter. Especially peanut butter on celery.


What do you most enjoy about living on the OBX? People are more friendly here.


Ioana Chirtes, 20 Ibanesti, Romania


Why did you choose to come to the OBX? To be by the sea.


Where do you go to school? Dimitrie Cantemir University of Economics


What do you study in Romania? Accounting and Management


Where do you work? Kill Devil Hills Dairy Queen


Enkhjargal Batjargal, 21 Darkhan, Mongolia


Why did you choose to come to the OBX? To work by the ocean.


What did you do study in your country? I was a math major.


Where do you work? Life on a Sandbar in Corolla


What do you find most surprising about living here? I am surprised that people are so friendly and polite.


What do you miss most about home? Our national food is buuz (a type of Mongolian steamed dumpling filled with meat—Editor). Our national holiday was July 11. I’m missing my home especially then. The horse racing and wrestling.


FALL 2013


What do you find most surprising about living here? The people in America are very nice. They’re always smiling.


What do you miss most about home? My family. My nephew, he’s 3-years-old. He calls me Mommy.


What American food do you like the best? Cheeseburgers and I like American Coca Cola. It is different than in Romania.


What do you most enjoy about living on the OBX? The ocean. In my country where I am from it is in the mountains.


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NEWS, EVENTS, VIDEO & MORE NORTHBEACHSUN.COM 25


By Kip Tabb


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