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the rows to deter the onion fly. Another session of planting would occur at the end of May when runner and dwarf beans would be planted. The runner beans would be grown in the same place each year. Marrows and greens planted, with Brussel sprouts planted in the firm soil between the rows of early potatoes. After the end of May there would be little time for gardening. Hoeing was often done by the light of the Parish Lantern (the moon). One thing these horticultural experts often miss out in their fanciful cottage gardens is a fruit tree. Most old gardens would have one i.e. apple, plum, damson and occasionally a pear or greengage. The surplus would be sold for a few shillings; the proceeds going towards the seeds for the next season.


Don’t forget that Veg Club Plus will have a stall at Coffee Break in the Sheltered Housing Community Room in Elin Way on Saturday 7th September from 10.00am onwards.


Good gardening! Jim and Julie


juliedraper@dumbflea.co.uk, (01763) 260323 edna_egg@yahoo.co.uk, (01763) 261824


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