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their activities and their long tails. Brent


keeps his Amboina Kings in a well-planted aviary which allows them


plenty of room to fly from branch to branch. He has opted for standard full-height aviaries with a flying length of 4.5 metres. “The males like to do elaborate flying and acrobatic displays for their mates,” he says. Brent offers his breeding pairs a standard vertical nest box –90- 120cm x 25-30cm. Hens incubate an average clutch size of three eggs for approximately 21 days and the babies fledge at about nine weeks.


earning


them a ‘near- threatened’ status. Amboinas are not only very pretty but also quiet and gentle – very different from most parrot species, says Brent, which tend to be noisier, more destructive and more aggressive. They are social birds and require daily interaction with their own kind or with other bird species. In an aviary setup, Brent has found that they do well when kept with smaller birds in a mixed collection. It’s important to remember that these parrots require space to accommodate both


20 BIRD SCENE


The Da Luz Diet Well-fed birds are healthy, happy and productive. In addition to pellets, include a variety of nutritious freshly prepared foods and a small percentage of seeds and grain. Remember that most freshly prepared foods will spoil and should be removed from the cage after a couple of hours. If your bird is not readily accepting new foods, try offering it to them early in the morning or in the evening, times when birds would naturally be foraging for food in the wild. Vegetables: Fresh veggies, whole or chopped, are great for keeping your birds healthy and in good breeding condition. Fruits: In South Africa, we are spoilt for choice, so feed a wide variety. Feed what is in season but try to feed the tropical fruits which parrots would be exposed to in their natural habitats. Birds with newly hatched chicks seem to really like apples and grapes. Other Foods: Birds can be fed a variety


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