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PROJECT / 8 CHIFLEY, SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA


GREAT ESCAPE


Bringing a splash of colour to Sydney’s CBD, 8 Chifley represents an Australian first for the creative stable of renowned architect Richard Rogers. Arup helped create a suitable nocturnal impact.


Over a career that spans more than 60 years, celebrated British architect Richard Rogers has earned global acclaim for his distinctive style: a desire to democratise architecture often by opening out the infrastructure of a building and placing it on full view. The most famous examples of this approach include the Centre Pompidou in Paris and Lloyds of London, but now, as Rogers celebrates his 80th birthday, there is a new addition to the list: 8 Chifley. Bringing a splash of colour to Sydney’s CBD, the new 34-storey tower aims to deliver a cutting-edge and highly efficient workplace for the future, combining a distinctive contemporary design, adaptable workspac- es, leading sustainability features, and generous civic space.


8 Chifley has been designed specifically for its prominent, north-facing site, bounded by Elizabeth, Hunter and Phillip Streets. Its highly transparent façade, heightened ceilings and legible structure ensure the building enjoys open and unobstructed outlooks and a sense of extensive space and


light within. The tower’s exterior includes a number of striking features, such as its red sway bracing and illuminated exterior fire escape, that set it apart from the Sydney norm. Working alongside architects Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (RSH+P) and developers Mirvac, Arup wcompleted all aspects of the lighting design. The original brief focused on the exterior fire escape stairway and the empty ground-floor atrium space, dubbed the ‘reverse podium’ by the architects, but this evolved during the design process into a comprehensive concept that would unify each of the open spaces - the atrium, the 18th floor terrace and the roof terrace - creating an aesthetic consistency that could exist independent of the interior illumina- tion. A key part of this was the illumination of the red sway frames that form the build- ing’s zigzagging exoskeleton.


Reverse Podium, Level 18 & Roof To complement the concept of horizontally


separated office ‘villages’, Arup worked with RSH+P to illuminate each of the exposed concreted slabs and roof feature with integrated liner LED luminaires. By day these are hidden within the exposed structure, at night they enliven the fabric of the building; reversing shadows caused in the day to create luminous soffits. To complement this, additional metal halide downlights are suspended at high level to il- luminate the glass lobby box at ground level and meet design recommendations within the Australian Standards in each area. The inclusion of this more utilitarian layer of light allows the LEDs to be switched off out of hours.


In accordance with the Richard Rogers philosophy of architecture, 8 Chifley proudly displays some of the building’s structural elements, such as the external fire escape and zig-zagging sway bracing. By illuminating these, as well as the open groundfloor, 18th floor and rooftop spaces, the building enjoys a visual coherence regardless of what office lighting is in use.


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