This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
042


DETAILS


Above left The Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre by Philip Cox Architects sits is overlooked by the city’s impressive twin towers. Above right Clarke Quay in Singapore required a more playful, colourful approach.


deeply rooted in our cultural histories: “There is a stark opposition of views be- tween the Orient and Occident when one looks at the philosophy of light – and per- haps it is embedded in our psyche through religion and parable. The West treats darkness as the unknown, something to be feared and dispelled by knowledge, repre- sented by light. In the Orient, it is exactly the opposite: darkness is the fountainhead of creativity, which nurtures and rejuve- nates to allow enjoyment of the limited bits revealed in light. This perhaps allows us to be more tolerant of darkness.” He notes that regional projects are influ- enced more than ever by the prolifera- tion of both online and print media that showcase stand-out projects from around the world and warns against what he refers to as the ‘imagification’ of lighting – the shift towards creating the photogenic rather than the experiential. To guard against this, he calls for more informed criticism and research in lighting design, a means of


ensuring projects deliver a more considered response to local needs. Technological advances have also brought unforeseen shifts in attitude, he says. Rapid improvements in LED technology have led to the indiscriminate and often unnecessary use of coloured light, while an increased de- pendence on simulations has made it harder to evaluate the subtle and more complex aspects of lighting. “Clients, designers and the profession at large are all responsible for keeping this balance,” he says. Perhaps unsurprisingly given his early ca- reer, Ghose believes the best schemes are those that emphasis the original architec- tural intent of a space. “I believe that well designed lighting plays the role of an ‘am- plifier’ of the sensory and emotive nuances generated by architecture and the interior,” he says. “As with any good amplifier, it is our role to maintain maximum fidelity and avoid introducing visual noise; sometimes we need to creatively edit to bring the essence into greater focus. We consciously


prevent ourselves from preconceived ‘good solutions’ and try to remain responsive in our interpretation of the visual environ- ment. In our studios it is an oft quoted adage that ‘good lighting is invisible’ and it is important to bear in mind that the stars of the show are always the surfaces we light – not the lighting equipment.” Most importantly, a successful lighting scheme is one that resonates with the view- er and end user. “The idea of resonance is one that pervades our design processes and is applied to the creative inputs that we receive from the design team, the client, the constructors, users and critics!” says Ghose. “The complexity is that each observer has their own paradigms to satisfy and, unlike a theatrical show, architectural lighting has a longevity which exposes it to long term scrutiny. Good lighting is able to negotiate the inherent contradictions of the built environment. It represents an equilib- rium between opposing paradigms, unlike engineering solutions, which represent an


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150