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036


DETAILS [lighting talk]


This issue we talk to Chris Bosse, co-founder of The Laboratory for Visionary Architecture (LAVA) and Adjunct Professor at the University of Technology Sydney.


COULD YOU TELL ME...


... what made you become an architect? Growing up opposite Frei Otto’s Institute for Lightweight Structures in Stuttgart in the 1970s - I remember it looking like a pirate ship from inside with its huge mast and membrane structure with a skylight around the tip of the mast. The result is very lightweight. Otto’s form finding experiments for the Munich Olympic Stadium remain a major influence on my thinking.


... how important lighting is to your architecture? The most important source of light is daylight. The effective use and play with light makes spaces livable, beautiful and sustainable. Plants only grow in light and humans only thrive in light.


... what excites you about light and lighting?


Nature is our inspiration in the use of light. I love snorkeling in coral reefs. Underwater the light refractions of the sunlight create endless patterns and artwork together with the sand.


Lighting can be invisibly integrated to satisfy everyday needs and senses. Our Future Home [1]


in Beijing uses daylight and artificial


light to create an atmosphere of nature and technology. Nighttime lighting turns the lush green environment into a technological garden of mystery. Tower Skin [2]


transforms identity, sustainability


and interior comfort of inefficient buildings. It collects solar energy and disperses it at night, improves the distribution of natural daylight and has embedded LED strips that act as an intelligent media surface.


And lighting animates. Our minimal surface installations like the MTV Music Awards [3]


stage, Digital Origami [4] and Green Void [5] used projected lights whilst our globe trotting Digital Origami Tigers


combine ancient lantern making methods with cutting edge digital design and fabrication technology and pulsating low energy LED lighting bring the sculptures to life.


I am currently working on a concept to turn daylight into artworks through refraction.


... why spending time thinking about and working with light is important to you?


I am drawn to light, like any human being, and if we want people to be drawn to our buildings and public spaces we have to design them in that way.


Our Masdar City Plaza turns into a lighting field at night, using energy that has been gained during the day. People walk past the Martian Embassy [6]


... about how you approach lighting a building through architecture?


Our creative process is Mankind, Nature and Technology. We love the contrast and synergies of mankind, nature and technology that we try to fuse in our projects. So we use nature’s principles to create efficient beautiful light filled buildings. And the latest technologies such as energy efficient LED, smart lights, to generate sustainable solutions to man’s needs.


... about the role lighting plays in the life of a city? And through your work, how do you contribute to it?


Nature has shown us for millions of years how to heat, cool, ventilate, light, how to adapt to environment. Technology creates


at night and wonder what is going on in there. It comes alive with red planet light projections!


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