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130 TECHNOLOGY / LIGHT SOURCES


VxRGB Vivid Vision


Verbatim Vivid Vision ensures that colours and fine details of objects are rendered accurately through a unique combina- tion of red, green and blue phosphors applied to a violet, rather than blue, LED die. This type of LED lighting is particularly effective in spaces where small differences in colour hues, tints and textures can have a significant impact. Suited to hospitality ven- ues, sophisticated retail outlets and museums where high contrast lighting enhances the unique features of art- works. The MR16 LED lamp is a retrofit replacement for typically 20W low volt- age halogen reflector lamps. Rated at 6.5W (equivalent to 20W incandescent lamps), it produces 180 lumens output over a 35° beam angle, with a colour temperature of 2900K and a CRI of 85. www.verbatim-europe.co.uk


MTG2 Lamp Orlight


The MTG2 lamp provides a high quality and quantity of light with up to 855 lumens output and a colour rendering index of CRI94 on certain variations. Available off the shelf in 4000K, 3000K and 2700K, these high output products will dim perfectly with any dimmer type. Orlight guarantee ‘flawless dimming’ and state on their website that lamps can be specifically tuned to match any dimmer type prior to dispatch. Or- light produce a complete range of architectural downlights to complement the MTG2 lamp. www.orlight.com


LAMPS


RefLED Coolfit Range Havells Sylvania


These new lamps operate at cooler temperatures allowing them to be used in enclosed luminaires such as fire-rat- ed downlights, IP65 downlights and small spotlights. Featuring automatic heat control (AHC) technology that allows self-regulation to avoid prema- ture failures, the product improves performance by reducing the power of the lamp through dimming. The lamps can be used in both open and enclosed luminaires, delivering 50,000 hours life when operated in open fixtures and thanks to the improved low operating temperature, will also deliver 25,000 hours life when used in enclosed fix- tures. This is an ideal solution for retail and display lighting, ensuring consis- tent light output. www.havells-sylvania.com


PAR38 LED


Acuity Brands The PAR38 LED lamp replaces 150-watt halogen lamps with only 25 watts, pro- viding 83 percent energy savings. The lamp is available in 900, 1200 and 2000 lumen packages, its advanced thermal design with ceramic substrates provides optimal cooling efficiency and consis- tent colour quality. www.acuitybrands.com


DR700 v2 MR16 Brightgreen


The new and improved DR700 v2 MR16 LED halogen replacement lamp features enhanced optics, a stylish sleek front and an exceptional dimming range. A new edition to the retrofit range; the 10.5Watt DR700 v2 MR16 provides all the brightness of a 50Watt halogen bulb using only 20% of the energy, it is so efficient in fact, that it will pay for itself in 14 months with 10 hours use a day. Other notable features include modified electronics ensuring excep- tional dimming functionality, a compact body for fitting into smaller spaces, compatibility with a wider range of existing fascias and is available in 40° or 60° beam angles, and in colour tem- peratures of 3000K or 4000K. www.brightgreen.com/au/


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