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119 FRESH FROM BIRNAM WOOD


The Southbank is well known for its continental style conviviality. A new project lit by ETC Stage Lighting Solutions is softening some of the areas few remaining brutalist outposts.


London’s Southbank Centre, the capital’s cultural heart, has never been known for its greenery; rather it has often been the area’s brutal concrete structures that have received the most acclaim, or disdain, depending on your architectural taste. Until just a few years ago, the concrete walkways that cut between the buildings were empty, bleak areas. Despite surrounding some of London’s most iconic venues, including the beautiful Royal Festival Hall, the passageways led nowhere useful.


In an effort to re-invent the space, a series of commissions were set up to create art installations that would make the long passageways destinations in themselves, and this year, Southbank Centre teamed up with Cornwall-based environmental education charity, the Eden Project, to create a woodland garden for the summer- long Festival of Neighbourhood, part of which has been lit with ETC Source Four Mini luminaires.


The Southbank Centre’s technical manager Roger Hennigan said of the project: “I


needed a fixture that would be able to project a powerful, focusable beam of light, using break-up gobos to give a dappled effect not only on the woodland but also on the green artificial turf. They also needed to be small, due to the relatively compact space.


“The tungsten source really brings out the best in the natural wood colours, and the shutters prevent the light from bleeding onto the ceiling. Focusing the fixtures was


very easy, I just reached up and adjusted them. No need for ladders.”


The Source Four Mini comes in black, white or silver as standard and has four field- angle choices capable of long throws. The fixture is available in a portable version, a canopy-mount design with an integral transformer, or as a Eutrac adapter with integral transformer, as used at the Southbank Centre. www.etcconnect.com


A GREEN CRYSTAL


The first centre dedicated to sustainable urban development has opened in London. Luxonic provided an innovative lighting scheme.


The impressive glass building named ‘The Crystal’, in the Royal Victoria Docks, London, hosts lectures, conferences and an interactive exhibition showcasing the latest cutting edge technologies. The building, a Sustainable Cities Initiative by Siemens, is a modern echo of the Crystal Palace of 1851, which hosted the Great Exhibition, and is designed to educate visitors in sustainable building techniques, technologies and solutions.


Luxonic Lighting has provided chilled beam luminaires throughout the office areas, while upward lighting emphasises the spaciousness of the double-height offices. The Flat FPO Lens luminaires provide controlled downlighting and a highly efficient diffuser optic that enhances the visual comfort of the office spaces. Luxonic’s high performance chilled beam luminaires include a DALI dimmable control


gear that contributes to energy savings, while chilled beam technology provides an integrated and effective solution to cooling and ventilation. The energy efficient lighting helps ‘The Crystal’ to further its claim to be one of the world’s greenest buildings. www.luxonic.co.uk


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