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TECHNOLOGY / CASE STUDIES


THE LIGHT ASCENDING


An Aladdin’s cave of priceless musical instruments, The Royal Academy of Music in London boasts its fair share of Stradivariuses, Amatis and Daniel Parkers. Havells-Sylvania took part in a recent refurbishment.


Known by students, teachers and music enthusiasts for holding some of Britain’s most prestigious historical musical instruments, as well as many original manuscripts penned by the likes of Purcell, Mendelssohn, Brahms and Vaughan Williams, The Royal Academy of Music Museum in London also contains a number of precious and priceless Stradivarius violins, argued to be the best sounding in the world. During a recent refurbishment, the museum underwent a substantial lighting-scheme upgrade with the aim of improving lighting efciency and the aesthetics of the instrument displays, as well as addressing preventative conservation UV concerns. Featuring a variety of Concord architectural ttings y aellsylania, the new lighting design not only highlights the stunning exterior, but discreetly blends


into the museum’s interior to show off its renowned collections of instruments, art, photography, manuscripts and scores. The building that now houses the Royal Academy of Music Museum, was originally designed by John Nash in 1822 (the year of the Academy’s founding), as part of the main York Gate entrance into Regent’s Park. The interior of the York Gate building was largely destroyed by bomb damage in the 1940s and in subsequent years it was used as coercial ofces. n the 0s the rade  listed uilding was leased y the cadey, which acuired a eritage Lottery Fund grant for its refurbishment and conversion to studios and practice rooms as well as the museum. Today, the museum provides daily inspiration to the Academy’s 650 students as well as to tens of thousands of visitors annually.


aellsylanias lighting design consultant, Vic Cieslewicz was approached by the museum to develop a display-lighting scheme that would reduce energy costs and improve instrument preservation while illuinating the collection in its nest form. Specifying high-colour rendering LED spotlights with minimal UV, Cieslewicz supplied the museum’s three permanent galleries with 100 Concord Beacon LED Accent luminaires. ith cuttingedge cooling n design, the Beacon LED Accent 13W maximises thermal management and reduces LED junction temperature. Meeting the tough demands of museum environments, the luminaire roides ero  radiation, signicant maintenance cost reductions, as well as an energy saving solution. www.havells-sylvania.com


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