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TECHNOLOGY / CASE STUDIES GREETING FROM FLORHAM PARK


Traxon Technologies provided lighting for the BASF office in New Jersey with the aim of helping the structure gain a LEED double platinum rating indicating perfect environmental credentials.


In 2012, Rockefeller Group Development Corporation completed a new


325,000-square-foot office building as part of The Green at Florham Park in New Jersey. The new office building features an open floor plan, colourful interior, ample natural light and a ‘green’ approach. Approximately 4,500 custom Traxon Cove Light AC Dim fixtures were added to recessed coves to provide ambient lighting in circulation areas, which also serves as emergency lighting.


Using line voltage and featuring a Plug’n’Play wiring system, Cove Light AC Dim has proved to be an excellent solution for this installation, as it eliminated the need for external power supplies or complex wiring, enabling extended run lengths. Traxon’s Plug’n’Play solutions do not require additional device configuration or set-up prior to use, therefore reducing cost and project completion time. The newly constructed building is designed to achieve LEED double platinum certification, the highest LEED certification issued by the United States Green Building


Council. Traxon’s Cove Light AC Dim with modified wattage has helped the building meet the necessary standards by complying with the energy codes and requirements. At BASF Corporation most of the cove light fixtures remain on 24 hours a day and all are on the emergency circuits. This lighting solution, which can also be managed and controlled by the staff, not only enhances the office environment, but provides safe and effective emergency lighting. www2.traxontechnologies.com


Pics: Gensler


WATFORD MAKEOVER


KPMG’s Watford office is home to over 100 staff. The refurbishment of their office has included the installation of a range of energy saving solutions from Wila Lighting.


For a company with sustainability at its heart, it is no surprise that energy efficiency was central to the specification for the KPMG Watford office refurbishment. Stewart Langdown of Wila Lighting said: “For a company of this size it was important to ensure that the products which were installed would provide not only the flexibility which they required from their work spaces but also energy efficiency.” The entire refurbishment included the ground and first floor office areas together with the reception, conference suites, meeting rooms and office pods. The products included Wila’s Tentec LED recessed downlights, which were supplied in a shallow version to fit easily into the ceiling void. The downlights incorporated a remote DALI dimmable driver to deliver enhanced energy efficiency and low lifecycle costs and were supplied in 4000K


to achieve a natural white light. Other areas of the refurbishment incorporated Wila’s LED E Connect Nero Accent recessed downlights, which are ideally suited to areas where accent lighting is required, and recessed luminaires from


the Avic range. Uniformity of the lighting and exceptional glare control, as well as ease of management will ensure that KPMG staff enjoy a productive work environment. www.wila.com


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