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111 Pics: Archivio fotografico Provincia di Rimini


PAINT THE TOWN PINK


As part of the raucous La Notte Rosa festival in Rimini, Italy, the city’s Arch of Augustus and Tiberius Bridge were washed pink using D.T.S. projectors.


Undertaken as part of Rimini’s ‘La Notte Rosa’ (Pink Night Festival), Italy’s answer to the Rio de Janeiro Carnival or the New Orleans Mardi Gras, this project saw two of the city’s most historic buildings washed in pink light. The Augustus Arch is one of the most important monuments in Rimini, built in 27 BC in honour of Emperor Octavian Augustus, it was once joined to the city walls and acted as a city gate. Originally built with Istrian stone, nowadays the structure is part made of white marble and comprises an arch and two ornamental half columns, which support the tablature and gable. Rimini’s Tiberius Bridge was originally planned and begun by Emperor Augustus but was completed by his successor and adopted son Tiberius after whom it is named.


The design of the bridge comprises five round arches made of Istrian marble, while four rectangular blind windows decorate the piers. The bridge is almost perfectly preserved.


The lighting was installed by New Service, Rimini, a rental company specialising in urban lighting projects.


Nicoletta Sacchini, director of New Service, said of the lighting project: “We decided to wash the Tiberius Bridge with side lighting to enhance the depth of the arches and the decorations.The lighting system is unobtrusive and minimally invasive: we laid a simple truss scheme to some trees standing at the two ends of the bridge on each side.”


Each system consisted of a battery of twelve Titan full colour LED projectors


by D.T.S., with spot and medium flood lenses, fitted with barn doors and fixed to a horizontal truss three metres high. The Titans also boast an IP65 rating. To illuminate the two sides of the Augustus Arch eight Delta 10 F LED wall washers from D.T.S., fitted with RGBW LEDs, were used. The Deltas were installed in a straight line in front of the monument at a distance of 10m from its base: two pairs on each side, slightly off center, enveloping the structures in a pink light.


State of the art lighting technology can enhance a country’s historic and cultural heritage bringing to people’s attention neglected ancient buildings while highlighting their importance within an urban context. www.dts-lighting.com


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