This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
104


TECHNOLOGY / AUSTRALIA BRIGHT SPARC


Running parallel to the VIVID Sydney event, the SPARC conference brought together Australian lighting designers, manufacturers and distributors.


Aphrodite Zumtobel


The Aphrodite is designed to create a shimmering projec- tion on vertical surfaces, redolent of reflections from wa- ter or flickering firelight. An optical system comprises an LED module and specially shaped glass cylinder controlled via a stepper motor. There are seven preset lighting scenes: white, colour-variable (RBA: red, blue, amber) and combinations of both. Manually or DMX controlled, projec- tion effects are randomly generated. www.zumtobel.com


Lofoot with TECOH MHx Gen2 Paviom


Cog LED Intralux Australia


The Cog LED is an IP65 rated, fully integrated linear projection system featuring the latest CREE LED technolo- gy. Cog LED offers great flexibility with adjustable beam direction allowing up to 150 degrees as well as a range of optical beam angles available including elliptical and symmetric.


Intralux and CREE LED have been work- ing together to achieve the ultimate combination of luminaire design vs. LED quality vs. light output, boasting an optimised heat dissipation design as well as thermal ratification by Cree, ensuring long term reliability. www.intralux.com


Folio Edge Lit Panel Sylvania Lighting


The Folio Edge Lit Panel from Sylvania Lighting’s Concord Division is a con- temporary alternative to the troffer. Ultra slim with added rigidity from the styled aluminum trim, it delivers colour consistency to greater than 90 CRI cou- pled with options for IP54, emergency and cyanosis as used in healthcare applications. Traditional T-bar sizes are complimented by mounting frame accessories for plaster, gyproc, metal and timber ceilings. Surface applica- tions benefit from a minimalist soft edged design that can also be pendant mounted. www.havells-sylvania.com


Circle of Light Flos Architectural


Presented by Australian distributor Euroluce, Flos Architec- tural’s Circle of Light is a series of trimless circular pro- files (Ø300, Ø600 and Ø900mm), seamlessly plastered into the ceiling and inset with 12, 24 or 36x 3W 3000K CRI80 LEDs. This provides lumen outputs ranging from 3,420- 10,260lm. Options are available for either narrow accent lighting or wider general illumination, both with anti-glare snoots. www.flos.com


Paviom introduced the enhanced Lo- foot range, including the Midi Post-top powered by Megaman’s TECOH MHx Gen2 module. The TECOH MHx is the first true LED alternative for metal ha- lide lamps. Its unique two-part design and capsule shape means that it can be fitted into existing and new fixtures and then replaced as required, without the need to replace the entire fitting; creating a sustainable solution as well as a future-proof fitting and lamp solution. The Lofoot family includes in-ground, bollard, column, projectors and post top versions. www.paviom.com


Sensor Node Organic Response


Organic Response lighting control is based entirely on Distributed Intelli- gence algorithms. A Sensor Node (motion sensor, ambient light sensor, infrared receiver, infrared transmitter and intelligent micropro- cessor) is integrated into each lumi- naire before delivery to the customer. Immediately on connection to mains power, Sensor Nodes form a mesh net- work, sharing occupancy information and controlling light levels accordingly. No further wiring, programming or commissioning is required, making the system completely plug & play. Organ- ic Response delivers significant energy savings with high occupancy comfort. www.organicresponse.com.au


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150