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100 TECHNOLOGY / SMART LIGHTING SUMMIT, MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA


As part of the Smart Lighting Summit, held in Melbourne in August, NDYLIGHT’s Steve Brown presented an update on their Building Lighting Upgrade project (BLU) to convert part of Melbourne University’s campus to LED light sources.


RHAPSODY IN BLU


In February 2012, the University of Mel- bourne decided to completely upgrade the Redmond Barry building (home to the psychology and biology departments) and University Square car park with the latest generation of LEDs to deliver more efficient and effective lighting solutions for their cus- tomers. This was a large scale pilot project to identify and resolve issues in upgrading all lighting to LEDs in existing buildings, the learnings of which will be used to drive fu- ture upgrades across the University portfo- lio of assets and the wider building industry. Dubbed the Building Lighting Upgrade project, or BLU, the process began through an expression of interest that went out pub- licly, that was responded to by over twenty applicants. This multi-step evaluation process (including a request for tenders) was evaluated by in-house and external experts (including NDYLIGHT) to ensure the selection represented market leading product and offered a complete solution. The final shortlist comprised four turn-key providers, who underwent a detailed inter- view process. The DTZ and Maxlight consortium were the winning group. When reviewing the properties within the university portfolio, the Redmond Barry building and the underground car park were selected to provide some certainty that the luminaires to be upgraded represented a large percentage of the typical fittings throughout the campus. The BLU pilot project upgraded every light fitting within the two locations to LEDs, consisting of approximately 2,800 fittings with over 85 different types of lamps sources, wattages and luminaires; ranging from linear fluorescent, compact fluores- cent, halogen, high intensity discharge, etc. delivering substantial energy savings (>60%), maintenance savings, improved light performance, the avoidance of the use of Mercury, and more. The project set out a series of goals: Achieving significant energy savings The switch to LED fixtures is expected to deliver an estimated 62% (or 584MWh) energy saving. This has yet to be verified via an International Protocol Measurement Verification Procedure (IPMVP).


These savings are greater than the con- ventional LED lamp retrofit and LED panels due to the ability to engineer the lumi- naires to provide fit for purpose solutions and maximise the energy savings at every opportunity. Rationalisation of Light Fittings The 85 types of luminaires previously used were reduced to fittings based on one type of LED linear module and one LED disc. This dramatically reduced the minimum storage requirements for spares (both in terms of quantity and the space required) and simplified the process for future lamp replacement, leading to a virtual elimina- tion of down-time.


Two sites were chosen for the pilot: the Redmond Building, built in 1961 and fitted with 1980s T5 fixtures, and the Universtity Square (pictured), built in 2000 and dominated by T8 fixtures from the last decade.


Waste Reduction Three tonnes of landfill were avoided through the refurbishment of existing lumi- naires, which also aided installation process by minimizing disruption, and due to the LED lamps’ extended lifespan and the fact LEDs are fully recyclable. Zero Maintenance Lamps came with a five year guarantee and an expected lamp life of ten years. The contract also includes an annual luminaire cleaning requirement. Smart Control Wireless controls were used wherever possible to avoid major wiring changes in existing ceilings. Watt-hours and hours run data is collected per luminaire and collated per floor, then transmitted via internet to a central data gathering and measurement hub.


IMPLEMENTATION NDYLIGHT set out the following process for implementing the pilot: 1. Undertake a detailed lighting audit to determine the lamp source and wattages, fitting dimensions, mounting arrangement, lighting layouts and fitting condition to de- termine whether existing luminaire bodies can be retained or disposed. 2. Develop an AGI lighting simulation to as- sess the most efficient replacement option, which can range from 20W through to 60W and is entirely dependent on the number of modules used in a single fitting. Once the AGI model designed for energy efficiency and AS1680 compliance was completed, this outlined the quantity and lumen packages required to implement the solution. 3. Following the AGI design, the contractor confirmed the implementation approach either by replacing the entire luminaire or by retaining the existing luminaire body and refitting with a modular LED. At the end of this step, a detailed luminaire schedule was developed which contained the luminaire dimension, lumen output packages, and mounting arrangements. 4. This schedule provided sufficient detail for luminaire fabrication. 5. Once fabricated, the site implementation commenced. 6. Of course, stakeholder interaction with the building occupants was carried out early on and during the implementation phase to ensure good acceptance from the occu- pants. The project is due for completion at the end of July 2013. DTZ have installed a series of electricity loggers as floors have been completed in accordance with the Interna- tional Protocol for Measurement and Veri- fication Procedures to measure the savings achieved to date, and already are currently about 430,000kWh into the projected 584,000kWh target. Pending the success of the project (which already seems assured), it seems likely that the BLU project will be rolled out to other buildings across the University of Melbourne campus. Steve Brown is Design Director at NDYLIGHT. www.ndy.com


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