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Frank Sinatra and Shane MacGowan sang about it. Woody Allen and Martin Scorsese enshrined it. Tony Soprano and Don Draper hung out here. Times Square appears in so many films that when you see it for the first time you expect the credits to roll. Broadway and Tin Pan Alley have helped form our popular culture in a way that few other cities have, meaning that you’re likely to feel immediately at home. Of New York’s five boroughs, Manhattan


is the one in which you’re likely to spend most of your time. Nicked by the British from Peter Stuyvesant in 1673 – who had bought it from local Native Americans for $24 worth of goods – today Manhattan’s streets are lined with views that will seem as familiar as your own home town. Grand Central Station, Times Square, Central Park, the Empire State Building, Macy’s, the Guggenheim Museum and the Chrysler Building – their classic glamour rubs shoulders with the bohemian sub-culture of Greenwich Village, the West and East Villages, the Meatpacking District, Chelsea, Harlem and Upper Manhattan. Probably one of the best ways to experience


exemplary new terminal building means there is seldom a feeling of overcrowding. Terminal 2 opened in 2010, and with this added capacity the Dublin Airport can now


the city is to grab a New York City Pass. Many of New York’s essential sites are bundled into a pay-one-price ticket. The key visits are the Empire State Building, the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, the American Museum of Natural History, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, Top of the Rock, Guggenheim Museum – or alternatively a Circle Line Sightseeing Cruise – all for $109. New York has undergone massive


“AER LINGUS AND BRISTOL HAVE A LONG HISTORY”


handle 30 million passengers per annum. The new terminal building cost some ¤600 million – and occupies 810,000 square feet (a lot) – but it looks to have been worth every penny, with Dublin now acting as a hub for trans-Atlantic flights. Aer Lingus entered the jet age in 1960, with


Boeing 720s covering the routes from Dublin to New York, and so began a long association between the two cities. It somehow seems right – both logistically and romantically – that Bristol, the airline’s oldest destination, should now have joined that route, linking these three great cities.


New York, New York


Oh, and by the way – it’s nearly impossible not to have an outrageously good time in New York.


refurbishment over the last few decades, with even some of its citizens forced to refurbish themselves too. The streets are safe, even the subway


holds no terrors. But an extraordinarily exciting atmosphere still hangs in the air. Art galleries, theatres, clubs, restaurants and cocktail bars now crowd streets that were once no-go areas, even to the NYPD. If you’ve ever wondered what the words ‘edgy’ or ‘chic’ meant, a visit to New York will set you right. It’s never been easier to get to New York,


and there’s probably never been a better time to visit. Remember, if it happens in New York – unlike Las Vegas – it won’t stay there. This is such an outré, photogenic, vivacious city you’ll want to flood Facebook with your memories of it. CL


bristolairport.co.ukaerlingus.com


www.mediaclash.co.uk Clifton Life 93


Chinatown groceries (no, we don’t know what they are, either)


Little Italy


Central Park


Walk this way: 5th Avenue


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