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Business Travel


Travel file


We flew: Bristol – New York via Dublin with Aer Lingus – flights from £334 We stayed at: The Hotel Beacon on Upper West Side. A short walk from Central Park and a manageable hike to 5th Avenue, this friendly hotel punches above the weight suggested by its three-star rating. Although all of Manhattan’s top attractions are within easy reach, you feel you’re staying in a genuine NY neighbourhood; it won’t take you long to identify your favourite diner for breakfast. The Beacon’s oversized rooms include several apartments with living rooms and kitchens, meaning you can make it a real home-from-home during your stay, while stylish décor and the new bar (serving great food) add a touch of boutiquery Eating out: We dined at Fitzpatrick’s Grand Central (fitzpatrickhotels.com: elegant, central hotel much beloved by the Irish traveller); Hell’s Kitchen (hellskitchen-nyc.com: progressive Mexican cuisine, ideally situated for a post- theatre meal near Broadway); Otto Enoteca Pizzeria (ottopizzeria.com: buzzy Italian with some of the best antipasti we’ve ever had); Spice Market (spicemarketnewyork.com: cool, buzzing joint in the Meatpacking District, purveying pan-Asian street food)


Manhattan transfer


LISA WARREN flies from Bristol Airport to New York — courtesy of Aer Lingus Regional


confers one huge benefit on the traveller: the US border begins just across the Irish Sea. Really. Unique for anywhere outside North America, Ireland offers US pre-clearance before you even leave its shores. For Bristol passengers this means you’re processed by US immigration officials – visa and customs – in the calm surroundings of Ireland’s newly refurbished main airport. With minimum fuss you are then shown the door that leads to the New World. If you’ve ever stood in an immigration


Y


HOTEL BEACON 2130 Broadway at 75th Street New York, NY 10023; beaconhotel.com


92 Clifton Life www.mediaclash.co.uk


queue at an American airport, you’ll know what a boon it is to arrive as a domestic passenger in the US. To be honest, once you’ve managed to negotiate the queue to buy your newspaper and coffee at Bristol airport, the worst part of your journey is over. “We are extremely pleased that Bristol-


based passengers have been able to appreciate the ease and times savings available by flying


ou do have to stop off in Dublin, but as it’s on the way, it doesn’t take up much time. In fact it’s a positive time- saver, because changing planes


to the US via Dublin,” said Simon Fagan, Chief Commercial Officer, Aer Arann – which operates Aer Lingus Regional. “Bristol Airport is of strategic importance


to our network. We estimate that over one million passengers travel through London airports from the south west to fly to the US — adding substantial time to their journey. Now there is an alternative. This service enables customers to fly from Bristol, pre- clear security and customs in Dublin, and make their onward trip to the US at reduced journey times.” Aer Lingus and Bristol have a long history.


The very first Aer Lingus scheduled flight took place on May 27, 1936. The entire Aer Lingus staff of 12 turned out to wave off the first Aer Lingus plane, Iolar, as it headed for Bristol. On board were five passengers and a cargo of Irish daily newspapers. But expansion thereafter, naturally enough,


was slow in those troubled times. However, after World War II, flights between England and Ireland were resumed, and by 1950 a total of 920,000 passengers had used Dublin Airport. Today almost 20 million passengers per year pass through the airport, and yet the


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