This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
AIR CARGO FOCUSFREIGHTER OPERATORS


Saudia Cargo grows dedicated charter fleet


Saudia Cargo is expanding its dedicated fleet of charter aircraft with the arrival of two B747-400 freighters. The latest additions will take the airline’s dedicated cargo fleet to 15 aircraft in total, comprising two B747-8F, seven B747-400F, two B747-200F and four MD-11F aircraft. Of these, a Saudia Cargo spokesman said 12 will be used for scheduled services to 27 freighter destinations worldwide, while the airline’s charter business will benefit from the dedicated capacity of three B747 freighters offering clients “more capacity in the ad hoc charter market”. “The combination of our scheduled and charter activities enables us to offer our clients


charters, flying AN-124 and Il-76-TD-90VD freighters. “Project work is the backbone of our business and an area where we have over 22 years of expertise,” insisted Dennis Gliznoutsa, Volga-Dnepr Airlines vice president, development. He explained: “Project work provides great prestige to our operational portfolio because some projects are extremely complex and can be years in the planning, forming a critical part of a customer’s strategic development.” What is more, for Gliznoutsa, every single flight is a project in itself, involving a process he described as “initiation, analysis, budgeting, planning, arranging aircraft and equipment, flight operation and customer liaison”. According to Gliznoutsa, Volga-Dnepr’s operations include both reactive and carefully pre-arranged services. “We can work on a project many years in advance or react quickly to a customer’s demand to have a flight airborne within 24 hours. For big projects, customers tend to want to involve us at an early stage because the service we provide is so critical to their


Ruslan reports that aerospace work is picking up.


Scholten: using three hubs in Saudi Arabia.


smart, cost-effective solutions via our three hubs in Saudi Arabia,” commented Peter Scholten, vice president commercial, Saudia Cargo. He remarked that the airline’s charter team offers a round-the-clock service and is able to provide quick-time solutions for a wide variety of project cargo, no matter what size. Its capabilities are far-reaching; not only is it actively involved in humanitarian transportation worldwide. Saudia Cargo also represents the bellyhold capacity on 145 aircraft, many of them widebody equipment, in operation across the rapidly expanding global passenger network of Saudi Arabian flag carrier Saudia.


supply chain and, therefore, their entire investment in whatever they are doing. “We are often part of the ‘planning board’ created by some shippers and manufacturers and the equipment we are asked to carry is [often] designed in such a way that it cannot be carried by anything other than an IL-76 or AN-124,” he informed.


Close communication


Gliznoutsa concluded: “I think our customers recognise what we do as a valuable part of their supply chain. The days when we were only called upon for emergency shipments have been replaced by a full understanding of the benefits that can be derived from integrating cargo charters into a cost/time-efficient logistics plan. This is partly the result of close communication with freight forwarders, shippers and manufacturers.” Volga-Dnepr, and the operational and marketing joint venture of which it is a part, Ruslan International, provide only part of the total air cargo capacity available for


charters, whether they are pre-planned months in advance or emergency in nature. Amongst the other big freighter operators active in the charter business are Polet Airlines, which flies both AN-124-100 and Il- 96-400T aircraft; National Airlines, which offers B747-400F capacity from the USA into areas such as Iraq and Afghanistan through its new hub at Dubai World Central International Airport; and Kalitta Air, also based in the USA and which flies B747 freighters. And the capacity of these and other specialist cargo charter carriers is supplemented by heavy load carrying capabilities of a number of mainline scheduled airlines that have chosen to use charters to supplement their regular service offerings. Many of the mainline scheduled carriers still flying freighters have chosen to offer cargo charters largely because the long-term, regular demand for their freight capacity is not as large or as stable as they would like. The operating environment in which airlines flying freighters has worsened markedly in recent years and the money that can be made from a last-minute charter is infinitely preferable to having expensive aircraft sitting on the ground. One all-cargo operator that has been making changes is Abu Dhabi based Maximus Air, which grounded its A300 freighter fleet in early June 2013 and cut back on staffing levels in order to “focus on more lucrative sectors” of its air cargo offerings. Maximus said the A300 fleet would be placed in storage awaiting the market to improve where it will be available for sale or dry lease. Fathi Buhazza, Maximus president and chief executive, commented: “By focusing on our ad hoc business... we will be in the position to ensure prosperity for the airline in the years ahead.” HLPFI


www.heavyliftpfi.com Supplement July/August 2013 95


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144