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SHIPPINGNEWS ROUND-UP more news at www.heavyliftpfi.com


HANSA in record reactor lift


he heaviest cargo ever loaded by specialist shipping line HANSA HEAVY LIFT was lifted onto HHL Valparaiso in Higashi Harima, Japan on June 13, 2013.


T The P2-class vessel took on a 1,283-tonne


reactor as well as three other reactors with weights of between 350 and 568 tonnes. The discharge of the record-breaking load took place on June 24 in Sovetskaya Gavan, Russia, with the HHL Valparaiso using its onboard cranes working in tandem to provide a lifting capacity of 1,400 tonnes. Tomas Dyrbye, HANSA chief executive, commented: “Our good reputation is based on our highly qualified team as well as the modern fleet of P-class vessels that can do extraordinary lifts.”


The record load inches onto the HHL Valparaiso.


he SAL Heavy Lift ship Svenja loaded five reactors recently weighing up to 1,450 tonnes each at the port of Wilhelmshaven, Germany.


Svenja carried the five reactors from Wilhelmshaven,


SAL Heavy Lift ships five reactors to USA T


Germany, to Chalmette, USA, where they were discharged onto barges for transportion to their final destination. Four of the reactors were nearly 50 m long with a diameter of 7.6 m, the fifth


eaway Heavy Lifting (SHL) has been awarded a contract by Subsea7 for the transport and installation of Statoil’s Gullfaks wet gas compression unit.


SHL – a Subsea7 joint


venture company and an offshore contractor in the oil and gas and renewables industry – will be responsible for the transport and installation of a 500-tonne wet gas compression station and a 300-tonne protection structure. The installation will be located 15 km south of the Gullfaks C platform in the North


www.heavyliftpfi.com NEWS IN BRIEF


ABS achieves fleet milestone Maritime classification society the American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) has announced that its registered fleet has surpassed 200 million gross tonnes. Approximately 12,000 vessels representing 105 flag states are now registered with ABS. According to ABS chairman and chief executive Christopher Wiernicki, more than 21 percent of new vessels on order are set for ABS classification.


BBC Chartering eyes South Korean growth Germany based heavy lift shipping provider BBC Chartering has strengthened its position in the South Korean market, basing a team of ten employees in Seoul to deliver chartering, operations and technical services. Lars Schoennemann, managing director of BBC Chartering’s Singapore office, commented: “(South) Korea represents a strategic growth market for us.” South Korea feature, pages 123-127.


weighed 540 tonnes with a diameter of 6.85 m. SAL Heavy Lift said that Svenja’s onboard cranes, which have a heavy weight lift capacity of 2,000 tonnes, came into their own with this shipment.


SHL to install North Sea compression unit S


Sea off the west coast of Norway. The project, which is planned to take place in the second quarter of 2015, will be executed using the heavy lift


crane vessel Oleg Strashnov (pictured) in a water depth of 140 m, commented Jan Willem van der Graaf, SHL chief executive.


CNCo acquires Polynesia Line


The China Navigation CO (CNCo), the deepsea shipping arm of the Swire Group, has taken 100 percent ownership of Polynesia Line Ltd (PLL), a US West Coast to the Pacific Islands operator.


First steel cut on Messina newbuild Italian shipping group Ignazio Messina has started the second stage of its EUR500 million (USD642.8million) newbuilding programme with a steel cutting ceremony for the first of four sisterships – the 45,200 dwt Jolly Titanio. They will all be built at the STX Shipyard in South Korea.


WWL ALS delivers US-bound power gear WWL ALS – a division of Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics (WWL) and Abnormal Load Services (ALS) – has delivered a 78-tonne generator and 63-tonne turbine plus ancillary equipment from Southampton port, UK, to a jobsite in Woodville, Texas, USA, in just 24 days.


July/August 2013 7


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